About two times a year, Netflix holds an internal hackathon where employees are encouraged to come up with creative ideas and explore new technologies, both in software and hardware, that tend to fall outside of their day-to-day job description. In other words, the Netflix hackathon is a great excuse for engineers to have a bit of fun. Just this past November, for example, you might recall that Netflix engineers managed to get a video stream running on a 1950s era TV.

By the time Netflix’s most recent hackathon ended, the streaming giant noted that it saw 200 engineers put together more than 80 unique hacks. “The hacks themselves ranged from product ideas to internal tools to improvements in our recruiting process,” Netflix said.

Of those 80+ projects, Netflix published a blogpost highlighting some of the cooler concoctions its engineers managed to come up with this year. Here’s a look at a few of them.

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Desktop Netflix experience

Netflix calls this project Tetris, and as you might imagine, it allows users to drag, drop, re-position and even remove rows from the Netflix splash page. Put differently, it’s Netflix customization unhinged. It’s really just a more powerful, desktop-based Netflix experience that you can customize. Someone explain to me why it took a ‘hackathon’ for Netflix to come up with this?

Watch Netflix in peace with QuietCast

This is a great little hack that lets users watch Netflix programming on their bigscreen but cast the audio straight to their headphones, either via Chromecast or another mobile device. This is a nice solution for users looking to get their TV and movie watching in without waking up anyone who might be asleep in the house.

Netflix takes on VR

Virtual reality is all the rage these days, and Netflix’s engineers don’t want to sit on the sidelines. Meet Netflix Zone, a Netflix UI designed specifically for the HTC Vive. This one is pretty cool as it presents Netflix’s catalog of content in what appears to be an antiquated video store.

Make sure to hit the source link below for the full rundown of Netflix’s 2016 Spring hackathon.

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