Sprint T-Mobile Merger FCC

FCC chairman Wheeler seems very happy that Sprint killed the T-Mobile merger

By on August 6, 2014 at 2:50 PM.

FCC chairman Wheeler seems very happy that Sprint killed the T-Mobile merger

Count Federal Communications chairman Tom Wheeler as one of the people who is happy that Sprint decided to call off its proposed $32 billion merger with T-Mobile. In a brief statement released on Wednesday, Wheeler expressed satisfaction that there would still be four major wireless carriers in the United States and added that Sprint should now take this opportunity to actually improve its network and service offerings instead of simply trying to acquire more spectrum through pricey mergers. More →

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Netflix FCC Net Neutrality Filing

Netflix would rather the FCC do nothing than authorize ‘fast lanes’

By on July 16, 2014 at 10:30 PM.

Netflix would rather the FCC do nothing than authorize ‘fast lanes’

It’s safe to say that Netflix is still really not a fan of the Federal Communications Commission’s proposal to possibly allow for Internet “fast lanes” where ISPs can charge content companies more to get their traffic delivered more quickly than on the “standard” Internet. The Verge has spotted Netflix’s official filing with the FCC discussing its proposed new net neutrality rules and the company basically says that it would be better if the FCC just did nothing instead of making things worse with its current proposal. More →

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Chattanooga Tennessee Municipal Broadband

Congresswoman bravely stands up for ISPs’ rights to deliver inferior service with no competition

By on July 16, 2014 at 5:30 PM.

Congresswoman bravely stands up for ISPs’ rights to deliver inferior service with no competition

Chattanooga, Tennessee’s municipal broadband network offers affordable broadband service that just happens to deliver the same 1Gbps peak speeds as Google Fiber. Given this apparent success story, you would think that state government officials would be happy to see other municipalities experiment with building their own fiber networks or to at least let Chattanooga expand its fiber service to more areas. But you’d be wrong. More →

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Wireless Net Neutrality

Wireless lobbyists are fighting to ensure net neutrality never applies to mobile networks

By on June 30, 2014 at 12:11 PM.

Wireless lobbyists are fighting to ensure net neutrality never applies to mobile networks

Though it has been diluted by the Federal Communications Commission in its current form, the idea of “net neutrality” was initially put in place in order to ensure that Internet services delivered to American consumers are kept fair and neutral for consumers and for content owners. The current proposal being batted around is anything but neutral considering the fact that it allows content owners to pay Internet service providers for “fast lanes” that will deliver their content to users more quickly and smoothly, but that is an entirely different issue. For now, we shift focus to a different part of the debate: Should wireless services be covered by net neutrality? More →

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FCC Commissioner Comments

Former FCC Commissioner: ‘We should be ashamed’ of the current state of U.S. broadband

By on June 19, 2014 at 6:55 PM.

Former FCC Commissioner: ‘We should be ashamed’ of the current state of U.S. broadband

Former FCC Commissioner Michael Copps is not happy with the current state of U.S. broadband service under the watch of former top cable lobbyist and current FCC head Tom Wheeler. The longtime consumer advocate spoke on Wednesday during a meeting of internet industry executives and politicians in Washington D.C. and didn’t mince words when discussing the current state of broadband Internet service in the United States. More →

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FCC Net Neutrality Plan

New bill unveiled to kill Internet ‘fast lanes’ once and for all

By on June 17, 2014 at 10:42 AM.

New bill unveiled to kill Internet ‘fast lanes’ once and for all

The Federal Communications Commission’s net neutrality plan has been controversial to say the least and now a newly unveiled piece of legislation aims to stop it dead in its tracks. Per The Washington Post, Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and Rep. Doris Matsui (D-Calif.) this week unveiled a new bill that would specifically instruct the FCC to use every power at its disposal to stop Internet service providers from setting up Internet “fast lanes” that would let them charge content providers more money for preferential treatment on their networks. More →

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Comcast Verizon Vs. Netflix FCC

The FCC wants to know if Comcast and Verizon are fleecing Netflix

By on June 13, 2014 at 4:00 PM.

The FCC wants to know if Comcast and Verizon are fleecing Netflix

Peering agreements between ISPs and transit companies or content providers aren’t technically net neutrality issues but they could still be potentially harmful to the open Internet depending on their terms. To  bring some more light into this perpetually shady area, Federal Communications Commission Tom Wheeler said on Friday that the FCC is going to investigate peering deals that Netflix has signed with Comcast, Verizon and other carriers to determine whether the terms are fair or if ISPs are using their market power to charge content companies excessive fees in exchange for getting improved connections to their network. More →

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FCC Municipal Broadband Projects

The FCC wants states to stop killing municipal fiber networks that put cable to shame

By on June 11, 2014 at 9:15 PM.

The FCC wants states to stop killing municipal fiber networks that put cable to shame

Over the past several years, we’ve seen brave state legislatures rise up to tackle the most dangerous threat to the American way of life: Small towns that hate their incumbent cable companies and want to build their own broadband networks. DSLReports points out that Federal Communications Commission chairman Tom Wheeler has written a new blog post where he points out that some towns and cities have successfully built their own high-speed fiber networks and that those municipalities haven’t yet succumbed to communism. More →

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John Oliver Net Neutrality Comments Appeal

John Oliver’s successful net neutrality appeal broke the FCC

By on June 3, 2014 at 5:15 PM.

John Oliver’s successful net neutrality appeal broke the FCC

Net Neutrality is one of the hottest tech- and Internet-related topics right now, as the FCC’s proposed regulations could have a negative impact on the way Internet companies work, and ultimately, on the pocket of regular Internet users. But because the matter seems complex, and awfully boring in some cases, not many people take a stance against the FCC’s proposals. That has been the argument of comedian John Oliver’s appeal to Internet trolls. And not only that — during his Sunday HBO show “Last week Tonight” he called upon trolls to tell the FCC how they feel about its proposal. More →

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FCC Net Neutrality Public Comment

A step-by-step guide for telling the FCC you hate its net neutrality plan

By on June 3, 2014 at 10:33 AM.

A step-by-step guide for telling the FCC you hate its net neutrality plan

Now that the Federal Communications Commission has decided to open its plan to allow for Internet “fast lanes” up for discussion, you might be wondering how to give the commission a piece of your mind. Redditor 2ShakesofaLambsTail has put together a handy guide that will take you through everything you need to do to register a public comment on the FCC’s proposal in just a small number of steps. More →

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How Is Broadband Speed Defined

The FCC may finally admit that 4Mbps doesn’t count as ‘broadband’ anymore

By on May 31, 2014 at 1:00 PM.

The FCC may finally admit that 4Mbps doesn’t count as ‘broadband’ anymore

When companies like Comcast talk about all of the intense “competition” they face in the broadband market, chances are they’re talking either about competition from mobile carriers that have capped data plans or from 5Mbps DSL services that are no longer adequate to meet our needs in the age of Netflix streaming. However, The Washington Post reports that the Federal Communications Commission is finally looking into changing its antiquated definition of broadband, which now stands at any Internet service that delivers download speeds of 4Mbps or higher. More →

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Net Neutrality Netflix vs. FCC

Here’s how Netflix feels about the FCC’s vote to end net neutrality

By on May 21, 2014 at 1:25 PM.

Here’s how Netflix feels about the FCC’s vote to end net neutrality

One of the biggest stories of 2014 so far has been the death of net neutrality. After the FCC voted last week to move forward with Tom Wheeler’s net neutrality plan, several tech companies released statements in which they reaffirmed their long-held positions opposing the proposed changes. Netflix especially has stood out as a figurehead for the net neutrality movement in recent weeks and on Tuesday, BTIG Research reported that Netflix CFO David Wells was asked about “the FCC’s view that peering and interconnection are not the same issue as net neutrality and are more like cousins or siblings.” More →

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Net Neutrality FCC Proposal

Forbes: ‘Net neutrality is a dumb idea’

By on May 21, 2014 at 9:05 AM.

Forbes: ‘Net neutrality is a dumb idea’

Where do I even begin with this one? The Federal Communications Commission voted last week to move forward with its controversial net neutrality plan, which seems to be designed specifically to ensure that the Internet is not kept neutral. Instead, the plan allows for the creation of Internet “fast lanes” so that Internet service providers can charge companies more for faster connections to end users.

If you oppose the new plan, there is action you can take. The FCC’s proposal is now in a period where open comments will be taken into account before the FCC creates a final set of rules. Those who see the slippery slope created by the FCC’s proposal can make their voices heard by reading the plan and submitting a public comment that addresses specific problems with the proposal.

If you support the plan, you can also be heard… by writing a column for Forbes. More →

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