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How to use Precision Find with iPhone, AirTag, AirPods, and friends

Published Nov 27th, 2023 9:16AM EST
iPhone 15 Precision Find
Image: José Adorno for BGR

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Precision Find is one of the most helpful features available with the iPhone. First announced with the iPhone 11 series, this function was pretty helpful for transferring files faster and more reliably via AirDrop. Then, with the AirTag announcement two years later, Apple gave a better utility to the U1 chip available for the iPhones.

Now that four years have passed since the U1 chip was introduced, and Apple already unveiled the second-generation ultrawide-band processor, here’s everything you need to know about it and Precision Find.

Compatible devices

iPhone 14 Pro Max in Deep Purple is the most popular color
iPhone 14 Pro Max in Deep Purple. Image source: José Adorno for BGR

Precision Find is compatible with the following Apple devices:

  • iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max
  • iPhone 12, iPhone 12 mini, iPhone 12 Pro, and iPhone 12 Pro Max
  • iPhone 13, iPhone 13 mini, iPhone 13 Pro, and iPhone 13 Pro Max
  • iPhone 14, iPhone 14 Plus, iPhone 14 Pro, and iPhone 14 Pro Max
  • iPhone 15, iPhone 15 Plus, iPhone 15 Pro, and iPhone 15 Pro Max
  • AirPods Pro 2 (Lightning and USB-C models)
  • AirTag

Despite the iPhone 15 series, which uses the second-generation ultrawideband chip, all the other devices use the U1 chip.

HomePod mini and HomePod 2 offer the U1 processor. Still, it’s not made for Precision Find but to establish a handoff connection from what’s playing on the iPhone to the HomePod and vice versa.

How does it work?

Image source: José Adorno for BGR

The ultrawideband chip uses high-frequency and low-range radio signals to locate other devices accurately. With that, it offers more accurate information than GPS or Bluetooth, as long as you’re in the range of this chip.

Apple says the U1 chip works 10-15 meters from one device to another. The company claims the second-generation ultrawideband processor is three times better. Although my testing was around 30 meters, Apple claims it can be up to 60 meters.

Precision Find AirTag and AirPods

Precision Find AirPods Pro 2 / iPhone 15 ProImage source: José Adorno for BGR

If you use an iPhone 11 or newer, you can use Precision Find to locate your AirTag and AirPods Pro 2. Here’s how it works.

  • Open the Find My app on your iPhone.
  • Tap the “Items” tab and select the AirTag you want to find; for AirPods Pro 2, you’ll need to find it on the “Devices” tab.”
  • Then, tap “Find” to start using Precision Find.

If instead of “Find,” there’s a “Directions” button, you need to keep moving until you’re in the range of this chip.

Precision Find Friends with iPhone 15

iPhone 15 Precision Find featureImage source: José Adorno for BGR

With the iPhone 15, it’s possible to find friends and family members using Precision Find – as long as both users have an iPhone 15 model.

To do that, follow these steps:

  • Open the Find My app on your iPhone.
  • Tap the “People” tab and select the friend you want to find.
  • Then, tap “Find” to start using Precision Find.

If instead of “Find,” there’s a “Directions” button, you need to keep moving until you’re in the range of the other person’s chip. In addition, they will receive a message saying you’re trying to find them.

What’s next

In the coming years, it’s possible that Apple will add the second-generation ultrawideband chip to other devices, such as the AirPods 4, AirPods Pro 3, and AirPods Max 2. It’s also expected that the second-generation AirTag also feature this new processor – although this item tracker is scheduled to hit markets in 2025.

In addition, the iPhone 16 and newer phones will also get this chip. It’s unclear if Apple is ever planning to expand this processor to its tablets or Macs, but we will make sure to update this article if we learn more about it.

José Adorno Tech News Reporter

José is a Tech News Reporter at BGR. He has previously covered Apple and iPhone news for 9to5Mac, and was a producer and web editor for Latin America broadcaster TV Globo. He is based out of Brazil.

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