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There’s an easy, legal way to get Netflix for free

Published Oct 27th, 2022 3:28PM EDT
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Image: Photo by PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

Ten years ago, Netflix was charging $7.99 for a subscription to its streaming service. Several price hikes later, Netflix’s standard plan now costs $15.49 a month, which is more expensive than the services of any of its biggest rivals. The good news is that even as Netflix increases its prices, there’s still one easy, legal way to get Netflix for free.

Back in 2017, T-Mobile introduced a “Netflix on Us” perk for its mobile customers. T-Mobile’s Magenta and Magenta Max plans include free subscriptions to Netflix, which is a benefit that no other mobile carrier offers. These are T-Mobile’s priciest plans, but if you need unlimited data and a high-speed hotspot, everything else is gravy.


Before you run to change carriers, there are a few important caveats worth mentioning.

First, the only way to get a Netflix standard subscription through T-Mobile for free is with the Magenta Max plan with at least two lines. If you have multiple lines on the cheaper Magenta plan, you’ll only have free access to Netflix Basic. The basic subscription only lets you watch on one screen at a time in standard definition.

As for T-Mobile customers with only one line, they can still get Netflix Basic for free, but they have to subscribe to Magenta Max, which starts at $85 a month.

If you are willing to jump through these hoops, you can enjoy everything Netflix has to offer free of charge. But that’s not all. T-Mobile’s Magenta plans also include a year of Paramount Plus for free, as well as at least six months of Apple TV Plus.

If you want to learn more about T-Mobile’s Netflix on Us perk, visit the website.

Of course, in 2022, there are also a number of free streaming services that don’t require a subscription at all. Be sure to check out our suggestions for the 10 best free streaming apps for movies and shows, which include Freevee, Pluto TV, and The Roku Channel.


More Netflix: Here’s why Netflix is removing some of its first original series

Jacob Siegal Associate Editor

Jacob Siegal is Associate Editor at BGR, having joined the news team in 2013. He has over a decade of professional writing and editing experience, and helps to lead our technology and entertainment product launch and movie release coverage.