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Urgent Coca-Cola recall: If you have any of these sodas or juices, throw them out

A fridge containing drinks open at night

Following the Kool-Aid recall and the more extensive Kraft Heinz drinks recall from recent weeks, we have a few new recalls involving soda and juices. This time around, we’re looking at two separate Coca-Cola recall announcements, impacting products like Minute-Maid, Sprite, and Coca-Cola. Lots of these soda drinks and juices might contain foreign substances like metal. You should stop drinking any of the Coke, Minute Maid, and Sprite products in the recalls and throw away any potentially contaminated products.

Kraft Heinz announced back in November that it found traces of glass or metal in various brands of popular beverages. The company advised Country Time Lemonade, Tang, Arizona Tea, and Kool-Aid buyers to ensure the supply they own wasn’t part of the recall.

Coca-Cola now has two separate recall actions in place concerning different batches of drinks. But both of them involve potential contamination with foreign substances.

The Minute Maid recall

The Minute Maid recall involves products that might contain metal pieces, Food Safety Network reported. Coca-Cola issued a recall for various Minute Maid drinks that might be impacted. The following Minute Maid flavors are part of the recall:

  • Berry Punch – Date codes Jan0422 NP and Jan0522 NP, Batch 0010323455 and 0010259344 (recall F-0276-2022)
  • Strawberry Lemonade – Date code: Jan0322 NP, Batch: 0010259346 (recall F-0277-2022)
  • Fruit Punch – Date Code: JAN0522 NP Batch: 0010323454 (recall F-0278-2022)

The Minute Maid products in the Coca-Cola recall were sold in eight states: Pennsylvania, Connecticut, New York, North Carolina, Maryland, Virginia, Maine, and New Jersey. Distributors might have sold some 7,000 cases of these Minute Maid drinks in the states that are included in the recall.

The juices expire in 2022, so buyers might still have them in their homes. If you still own Minute Maid drinks from the recall lots above, you should stop consuming them immediately. Instead, you should seek a refund or discard the products.

The Coca-Cola and Sprite recall

The Minute Maid recall is the most recent Coca-Cola recall, but the company issued a similar recall in late November. Per Commissary, the Coca-Cola recall involved Coca-Cola and Sprite soda cans containing an undisclosed foreign matter. That’s according to a Department of Defense All Food and Drug Activity message issued on November 24th, 2021.

These are the Coca-Cola and Sprite product subject to recall:

  • Coca-Cola 12 ounce cans: Date Code: AUG 1522 WM B
  • Coca-Cola 12 ounce cans: Date Code: AUG 1522 WM C
  • Sprite 12 ounce cans: Date Code: AUG 1522 WM B

Like the Minute Maid products in the more recent recall, the Coca-Cola and Sprite products above expire in 2022. That means buyers might still own sodas that contain the unspecified contaminant. Coca-Cola sold the recalled cans of Coke and Sprite across various Southeastern states.

The Defense Commissary Agency publicized the Coca-Cola recall to all stores. As a result, the drinks from those lots were removed from store shelves. Customers who purchased the Coca-Cola and Sprite cans from the recall should return the products for a full refund or discard them.

Other recalls you should be aware of

It’s not often we see so many juices and sodas recalled from a huge company like Coca-Cola. Of course, the Minute Maid recall and Coke/Sprite recall aren’t the only recalls you need to be aware of right now.

There are several other recent recalls that our readers need to know about. You’ll find a few more below from our earlier coverage. Be sure to check your refrigerators, pantries, and medicine cabinets for these dangerous recalled products:

Chris Smith started writing about gadgets as a hobby, and before he knew it he was sharing his views on tech stuff with readers around the world. Whenever he's not writing about gadgets he miserably fails to stay away from them, although he desperately tries. But that's not necessarily a bad thing.




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