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Ice cream recall: Check your freezer because 4,481 cases of frozen dessert were recalled

Ice Cream

It’s getting warmer outside, so you might be inclined to buy more ice cream than usual. But if you are allergic to certain ingredients, you should be aware of several ice cream recalls due to undeclared allergens. That includes a new Planet Oat ice cream recall that was just announced.

Earlier, Van Leeuwen recalled an ice cream brand after discovering it contains two tree nuts (cashews and pistachios) that are not listed on the label. A few weeks ago, we reported on a larger recall concerning several types of ice cream, including flavors that might have contained undeclared peanuts.

The brand new Planet Oat ice cream recall also concerns peanut allergies. Two different flavors might contain peanuts without any mention of the common allergen on the label.

Planet Oat ice cream recall

HP Hood announced the Planet Oat ice cream recall earlier this week. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) shared the announcement at this link.

HP Hood is recalling 4,481 cases of Planet Oat Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough and Planet Oat Chocolate Peanut Butter Swirl Non-Dairy Frozen Dessert with best-by dates of 12/17/22.

Here are the identifiers for the two products:

  • Planet Oat Chocolate Peanut Butter Swirl Non-Dairy Frozen Dessert, One Pint – Item number: 70986, UPC: 44100709869
  • Planet Oat Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Non-Dairy Frozen Dessert, One Pint – Item number: 70990, UPC: 44100709906

The company distributed the two Planet Oat products nationwide in the continental United States. Additionally, HP Hood shipped the two ice cream flavors in the recall to Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, St. Maarten, and the Cayman Islands.

A retail customer found that the ice cream contained undeclared peanuts and contacted HP Hood. The company discovered that it packaged some Chocolate Peanut Butter Swirl in a Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough container.

The former contains peanuts, but the container does not list the ingrediant.

Planet Oat ice cream recall: The two flavors that can contain peanuts.
Planet Oat ice cream recall: The two flavors that can contain peanuts. Image source: FDA

Peanut allergies

People suffering from peanut allergies will experience symptoms when consuming products that contain the ingredient. Eating ice cream from the Planet Oat containers in the recall might trigger symptoms.

Adverse reactions can be immediate and can include skin reactions (hives, redness, swelling), itching or tingling of the mouth and throat, digestive problems (diarrhea, cramps, nausea, or vomiting), tightening of the throat, shortness of breath or wheezing, and a runny nose.

Allergic reactions can be life-threatening in people with severe allergies. These people may experience anaphylaxis symptoms. They might not be able to breathe as the airways tighten. Blood pressure can drop and pulse can increase. Moreover, anaphylaxis can lead to dizziness, lightheadedness, and loss of consciousness.

That said, HP Hood said it has not yet received any reports of illness from customers who purchased the two Planet Oat ice cream flavors in the recall.

Planet Oat ice cream recall: Identifiers can be found on the bottom of the container.
Planet Oat ice cream recall: Identifiers can be found on the bottom of the container. Image source: FDA

What you should do

If you have any Planet Oat ice cream containers at home, you should ensure they’re not part of the recall. The company advises customers not to consume the products. Instead, they can return the ice cream to the place of purchase for a full refund or exchange.

The Planet Oat ice cream is still good to eat if you don’t suffer from peanut allergies. But keeping it at home is risky, as you might inadvertently serve it to someone with a peanut allergy.

Customers who think they’ve experienced allergic reactions after eating the Planet Oat ice cream should contact their doctors.

Finally, make sure you read the full press release for the Plant Oat recall. It contains additional information, including contact information for the company. You’ll find it on the FDA website.

Chris Smith started writing about gadgets as a hobby, and before he knew it he was sharing his views on tech stuff with readers around the world. Whenever he's not writing about gadgets he miserably fails to stay away from them, although he desperately tries. But that's not necessarily a bad thing.