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Watching the BTS members figure out Instagram is the purest joy of 2021

BTS members TV interview

BTS is the biggest music act on the planet right now, but even globe-dominating pop superstardom doesn’t eliminate certain frustrations in life. Like the befuddlement that first-timers so often encounter when deciding to open an Instagram account. Something that BTS’ fans are getting to witness and enjoy right now, in real-time, as the K-pop superstars in recent days each opened their own personal accounts on the platform. It is, indeed, a measure of the group’s popularity that — fresh off of some pretty massive concerts in LA and another year of chart-topping new bangers like Butter and Permission to Dance — the group’s solo Instagrams have kicked off a new wave of publicity and headlines. As all seven BTS members are settling into a temporary hiatus, ahead of a new album and concert in just a few months’ time in Seoul.

It’s during this downtime that the kings of K-pop decided to augment their existing online presence, which already includes an official group BTS account, with personal accounts for each member. And here’s the thing: You don’t even need to closely follow the group or its music to appreciate the charm in the fact that, one, the members seem to be using Instagram as a kind of public group chat. A way to keep in touch, while they’ve all dispersed for the holidays. And, two, that some of them found the basics of the app to be a little head-scratching at first (like, no, leaving a heart emoji on your bandmate’s post does not mean that you’ve “liked” that post).

New Instagram accounts for all 7 BTS members

In just a matter of days, all seven members’ accounts have amassed at least 20 million followers each. And while they’ve all wisely got comments limited on their accounts, at least one BTS member (Suga) left his comment section public on his first post.

Which meant that, naturally, tons of BTS’ ARMY — which is the name of the group’s community of fans — quickly flooded the post with comments of the “Omgggg” variety. Suga eventually fixed that setting and posted a picture of a red square, as you can see below.

Underneath it, he wrote, according to a Google translation: “Instagram is so hard :(“

As for BTS member Kim Tae-hyung (known by his stage name “V”), he was rocking along fine on Instagram until he decided to follow Jennie, of the K-pop group Blackpink. And, of course, that started a whole … thing.

Basically, fans’ heads exploded at the implications. So V decided to head over to Weverse, a Korean mobile and Web platform, to explain that Jennie was simply a “recommended” account that Instagram suggested he follow. So he just, you know, clicked on the thing!

On Weverse, V lamented about Instagram that “It’s a scary app.”

Instagram’s newest “Dynamite” accounts

In other posts, some of the BTS members have alternately voiced some confusion about what exactly they should post on the platform, declaring Instagram difficult to use. V in one post even suggested that Suga watch a “convenient” YouTube tutorial if he wants to get better at the ‘gram.

“Why do you press ‘like’ on Instagram?” Jin commented on the post, below, from BTS member J-Hope. “Does it mean ‘I like your writing/post’?”

Celebrity internet content does not get much more wholesome than this.

The group’s fans, of course, are loving all of this, partly because of the group’s hiatus. Because of the intensity of competition, and the prevalence of so many groups, it’s rare for K-pop acts to take this kind of break. But this is also just one more thing that speaks to the immensity of BTS’ success.

“BTS stayed active in order to engage with fans in 2020 and 2021 amidst the COVID-19 situation, and achieved dazzling results to cement themselves as top global artists,” reads an announcement in recent days from the group’s management, Big Hit.

“The period of rest will provide the members of BTS who have tirelessly committed themselves to their activities a chance to get re-inspired and recharge with creative energy.”

Andy is a reporter in Memphis who also contributes to outlets like Fast Company and The Guardian. When he’s not writing about technology, he can be found hunched protectively over his burgeoning collection of vinyl, as well as nursing his Whovianism and bingeing on a variety of TV shows you probably don’t like.




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