In an effort to try and win support for (and to speed along) its still-pending merger with Sprint, T-Mobile has rolled out a suite of initiatives that include everything from “Project 10 Million” (which will bring free internet  to 10 million households) to a new wireless plan announced Thursday that costs a shockingly low $15/month.

About the latter, the plan is called T-Mobile Connect and costs only half as much each month as the lowest-priced T-Mobile plan currently offered today. With it, users would get unlimited talk and text, as well as 2GB of data.

That 2GB amount, of course, would be pretty easy to use up quickly via access to the 5G data the plan also comes with. This is why it’s also good to know there’s a $25/month version of the plan that bumps up the data allowance to 5GB. T-Mobile is so eager for users to sign up that they’re promising to throw in an additional 500MB to your monthly data allowance every year you have the plan, meaning you would keep getting an extra 0.5GB of added over at least five years — a time period, by the way, during which T-Mobile also says the price of your plan wouldn’t go up.

As if that wasn’t enough, as we mentioned at the outset, T-Mobile is also promising additional efforts:

  • Project 10 Million, which T-Mobile describes as “an unprecedented new program designed to eradicate the homework gap that exists for millions of children by offering free service and hotspots and reduced cost devices to 10 million households around the US over five years.”
  • And, the Connecting Heroes Initiative, which the company says would be a 10-year commitment to offer free 5G access including unlimited talk, text, and smartphone data to every public and nonprofit US state and local police, fire, and EMS agency across the country.

It’s important to note: These efforts aren’t happening or live as of today. They’re contingent on the merger finally officially closing. As a reminder, T-Mobile’s takeover of Sprint has won federal regulatory approval. It’s only being held up now by a lawsuit brought by a group of state attorneys general who want to block the deal, but the company is hoping efforts like these can build up some additional support for the deal.