Aquaman has certainly made a big splash for Warner Bros., having grossed more than $1.14 billion since its opening in December, so it’s no surprise moviegoers aren’t finished being treated to the story of the half-Atlantean Arthur Curry, who’s also the film’s titular hero.

Indeed, Warner Bros. has now gone ahead and pegged the date when Aquaman 2 will land in theaters. December 16, 2022, is when the sequel will arrive, the studio confirmed Wednesday, though it’s unclear as of yet whether James Wan — who directed the first movie — will return to the director’s chair for the sequel.

The studio is confirming, however, that he’ll be back as a producer. Also, Aquaman co-writer David Leslie Johnson-McGoldrick will be back as well.

The first film was certainly a success on a number of fronts, including in telling a compulsively good story about one of the DCEU’s lesser-known heroes, and portraying the underwater kingdom of Atlantis as a visual spectacle of dazzlingly beautiful color. And the work paid off. As Forbes noted in a report earlier this month, Aquaman has now swum past the domestic gross totals of other big DC Films titles, like Suicide Squad and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, to achieve an enviable result. The result being that Aquaman is now the highest-grossing DC movie ever — and, again per Forbes, it’s also the 20th highest-grossing movie of all time.

While Warner Bros. has only just now set the date for a sequel, Aquaman did so well at the box office right out of the gate that there was actually talk of a sequel almost immediately after its world premiere. Which, remember, was in China — one of a few unusual elements of the film’s rollout that helped it reach the biggest audience possible.

Another piece of the marketing package included a novel arrangement with Amazon, in which Amazon Prime members were able to buy tickets to a private screening in the week before the movie’s US release, which was another element that helped the movie garner plenty of buzz.

Andy is a reporter in Memphis who also contributes to outlets like Fast Company and The Guardian. When he’s not writing about technology, he can be found hunched protectively over his burgeoning collection of vinyl, as well as nursing his Whovianism and bingeing on a variety of TV shows you probably don’t like.