Days after unofficial reports claimed that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was considering a ban on the Galaxy Note 7 in light of Samsung’s unprecedented recall, the governmental agency released an official statement on the matter. A ban on taking the Galaxy Note 7 on your next flight isn’t enforced yet, but the FAA is taking a special interest in Samsung’s exploding phablet.

DON’T MISS: Everything you need to know about preordering the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus

Following the official recall, more and more incidents of exploding Galaxy Note 7 batteries have surfaced. The faulty battery is allegedly responsible for setting a car (image above) and a house on fire in the US alone.

Samsung, meanwhile, is yet to recall the Galaxy Note 7 the official way — at least in the USA. That means the FAA can’t impose a ban on the device and — even worse — the phone is still legal to sell in the region.

That said, the FAA is taking steps to ensure everyone’s safety. The agency posted a statement on its site and Twitter, advising Galaxy Note 7 users not to use or recharge the phone while on the plane:

“In light of recent incidents and concerns raised by Samsung about its Galaxy Note 7 devices, the Federal Aviation Administration strongly advises passengers not to turn on or charge these devices on board aircraft and not to stow them in any checked baggage,” the company said.

The notice is also posted at the top of the Pack Safe page of the FAA website where various materials that can’t be taken on a flight are described. Independently of the FAA, some airlines may ban the Galaxy Note 7 for the time being.

View Comments