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Possible M2 Max Geekbench score leaks: Here’s how much faster a new Mac can get

Updated 1 month ago
16-Inch MacBook Pro
Image: Christian de Looper for BGR

With no signs of a new Mac being released in these last few weeks of 2022, it doesn’t mean Apple isn’t readying a new computer for its hard-core users in the next few months, as a possible M2 Max chip Geekbench score just leaked online, showing the improvements that the M2 line can get shortly.

According to a tweet by ShrimpApplePro, the Geekbench score of a “Mac14,6” running macOS Ventura 13.2 – Apple is currently publicly testing macOS Ventura 13.1 – with 96GB of RAM and 12 cores scored 1,853 on a Single-Core and 13,855 on a Multi-Core.

As it seems, these first results show that this new chip is slightly better than the M1 Max available on the Mac Studio, which scored 1,755 in Single-Core and 12,333 in Multi-Core. These results show that Apple will likely maintain the 5nm technology more than its predecessor, as TSMC is still trying to mass-produce a processor with 3nm.

While this M2 Max Geekbench score didn’t impress much, this could also mean that the software isn’t ready to read the power of a new Mac as this chip hasn’t been out yet.

The M2 Max chip will likely be available for the new 14- and 16-inch MacBook Pro and a new generation of the Mac Studio if Apple plans to add every new chip to these Macs.

With the 24-inch iMac, on the other hand, Bloomberg has reported that Apple opted to skip an M2 version and focus on an entry-level M3 chip for its successor.

As of now, it seems the M2 lineup will be a modest upgrade compared to the current M1 lineup, as these chips will likely offer a 15% horsepower booster in all the models available.

One thing is for sure, we’ll have to wait until Apple announces the new processors so we can adequately compare them with the existing Macs.

José Adorno
José Adorno Tech News Reporter

José is a Tech News Reporter at BGR. He has previously covered Apple and iPhone news for 9to5Mac, and was a producer and web editor for Latin American broadcaster TV Globo. He is based out of Brazil.