One of the strangest Galaxy S20 rumors that we’ve heard so far is that all three phones will have almost flat displays, and it sure looks like that will be the case. It’s unclear why Samsung decided to go for this particular design at a time when its main competitor is making phones with extreme curvatures — the Mate 30 Pro features a waterfall screen, while the P40 Pro is rumored to have four curved edges. But reducing the curvature of the screen can certainly help protect that device better against drops.

If you happen to own a Galaxy device with a busted screen, however, you’re in luck, as Sprint will charge a flat, no-questions-asked $49 fee to replace it. You can even get your screen repaired if you’re not a customer.

While the newest Galaxy phones, including the Galaxy S10 and Note 10 flagships are not supported, Sprint explains on its site that older models, including the S7, S8, S8+, S9, S9+, and Galaxy Note 8 all qualify for $49 screen replacements.

Screen damage is one of the most common issues affecting phones nowadays, and replacing a broken display can be expensive, depending on what model you’re rocking. That’s why Sprint’s deal is worth looking into if you’re not quite ready to upgrade to a brand new Galaxy phone in the near future.

If your phone is not eligible for the cheap repair, the page reads, Sprint is ready to give you $150 towards a brand new device. And herein lies the magic of the offer, as it’s likely that Sprint is hunting for new customers with this viral repair promo. After all, anyone with a device that’s several years old whose screen was just damaged might be better off with a brand new smartphone. The fine print specifies that devices that qualify for the trade-in program shouldn’t be older than iPhone 6s or Galaxy S5.

In fact, if you’re planning on taking advantage of the trade-in program, you might be better off waiting a couple of weeks, as Samsung is about to unveil the Galaxy S20. Preorders will kick off on February 11th, leaks suggest, and the phones should be more expensive than expected. $150 in savings might help.

Chris Smith started writing about gadgets as a hobby, and before he knew it he was sharing his views on tech stuff with readers around the world. Whenever he's not writing about gadgets he miserably fails to stay away from them, although he desperately tries. But that's not necessarily a bad thing.