NOOK subscribers get access to The New York Times’ digital content, too

By on April 6, 2011 at 1:21 AM.

NOOK subscribers get access to The New York Times’ digital content, too

Late last month, Amazon announced that customers subscribed to The New York Times via its eReader would qualify for a free digital subscription to the paper’s website. Not to be outdone, Barnes & Noble today announced that users subscribed to The Times via the NOOK Newsstand will also have full access to the  publication’s web content, too. The famed paper made waves on March 17th when it announced that it was moving to a pay wall model for its website. Users are allowed to read twenty NYT articles each month before they bump into the new toll booth and are required to pay for access. While the publication noted that those subscribed to its traditional home delivery service would be given full-access to all online content, it was not made clear how those digesting the Times via eReaders would be affected. The full press release is after the break. More →

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Amazon: NYT for Kindle subscription now includes web access, too

By on March 29, 2011 at 8:36 AM.

Amazon: NYT for Kindle subscription now includes web access, too

On Tuesday, Amazon announced that Kindle owners that have signed up for a Kindle subscription to The New York Times will also be able to access NYT content at no additional charge. The New York Times said on March 17th that it will begin charging readers for access to its website. After reading 20 articles, readers will be prompted to sign up for subscription plans that range from $15 to $35 every four weeks, but if you own a Kindle, you could be saving a few bucks — The New York Times for Kindle costs just $19.99 per month. “New York Times readers on Kindle are a very loyal and important audience, and we are pleased to be able to include online access as part of their subscription experience,” said Yasmin Namini senior vice president, marketing and circulation, and general manager, reader applications, of The New York Times Media Group. Hit the jump for the full release. More →

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The New York Times to offer iTunes subscriptions

By on March 17, 2011 at 2:08 PM.

The New York Times to offer iTunes subscriptions

In tandem with its announcement that it will move to a paid subscription model for online content, The New York Times said Thursday that it will also begin to sell subscriptions for news content in its mobile apps for the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch. As per Apple’s iTunes App Store terms, The New York Times will also have to fork over 30% of the revenues from each subscription sold. Users will be able to access the “Top News” content for free, but will have to subscribe for access to other stories. Eileen Murphy, spokesperson for the Times, told AllThingsD that content will also be available for Android devices, as well as BlackBerry smartphones, although it will not be selling subscriptions through those app stores. As we reported earlier, those viewing The New York Times content will be able to read 20 articles at no charge, and subscription plans will range from $15 to $35. The $35 option provides all access to digital content, although we also found that print subscriptions, which include full digital access, may save users some money each month. More →

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The Grey Lady builds a pay wall; New York Times to charge for online content after March 28th

By on March 17, 2011 at 12:05 PM.

The Grey Lady builds a pay wall; New York Times to charge for online content after March 28th

In a post on the publication’s web site today, The New York Times announced its intentions to move to a paid subscription model — often referred to as a “pay wall” — for access its online content beginning on March 28th. Currently being tested in Canadian markets, the paper plans to provide users with a small sampling of Times content each month for free, after which readers must pay for access. “On NYTimes.com, you can view 20 articles each month at no charge (including slide shows, videos and other features),” writes Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, the site’s publisher. “After 20 articles, we will ask you to become a digital subscriber, with full access to our site.” The company’s mobile application users will still be able to access all articles in the “Top News” section free of charge, but access to other content will require a subscription. “If you are a home delivery subscriber of The New York Times, you will continue to have full and free access to our news, information, opinion and the rest of our rich offerings on your computer, smartphone and tablet,” continues Sulzberger. The subscription plans will range from $15 to $35. The move may be an attempt to push digital consumers back towards the traditional print medium. Home delivery of The New York Times is roughly $8 per week, making a four week subscription ($32) — which includes free access to all digital Times mediums — slightly cheaper than the digital-only “All Digital Access” offering ($35). The announcement did not specify if those paying for digital content would still be subjected to online advertising. More →

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NYT: Nokia suffers from 'stifling bureaucratic culture'

By on September 27, 2010 at 11:52 AM.

NYT: Nokia suffers from 'stifling bureaucratic culture'

The New York Times has an interesting piece up about the hardships Nokia’s new CEO, Stephen Elop, is about to face. Insiders and former employees describe the inner-workings of Nokia as a “stifling bureaucratic culture.” Citing the 2002 cancellation of a 3D user interface for Symbian handsets and the 2004 scrapping of a full-touchscreen prototype device and online mobile applications store, the Times details just what kind of corporate environment Mr. Elop is stepping into. “Proposals were often rejected because their payoffs were seen as too small,” said Ari Hakkarainen, a Nokia manager from 1999 to 2007. Kai Nyman, Nokia’s former chief architect for enterprise domain strategy, described the scrapping of a 3D interface his team had created in 2002; management rejected the idea as it added $2.05 in production costs to each handset. Samsung release the first 3D interface 7-years later in 2009. Nokia is still set to sell a mind-boggling 70 million smartphones this year — not to mention account for 1.6% of Finland’s GDP — let’s hope Mr. Elop can turn the corporate culture around. More →

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The Hurd Chronicles: HP and Oracle settle CEO suit

By on September 21, 2010 at 2:18 PM.

The Hurd Chronicles: HP and Oracle settle CEO suit

Well, we might as well close the loop on this one. Last month, we told you how former HP CEO Mark Hurd was ousted by HP, complimented by Larry Ellison, and then hired by Oracle. We also told you how the Oracle hiring prompted a lawsuit from Mr. Hurd’s former employer. Now, the New York Times is reporting that the two sides have reached an agreement on the embattled executive’s future. In exchange for dropping the lawsuit, Hurd will forfeit nearly half of the $28 million compensation package he was given by HP. The former HP chief, and now Oracle President, will give up 330,177 shares of performance-based restricted stock and 15,853 shares of time-base restricted stock (that’s about $13.34 million using today’s stock price). Oracle and HP, who do quite a bit of business together, did their best to reassure stock holders that the two companies are on the mend. “Oracle and HP will continue to build and expand a partnership that has already lasted for over 25 years,” said Oracle CEO Larry Ellison. “HP and Oracle have been important partners for more than 20 years and are committed to working together to provide exceptional products and service to our customers,” said Cathie Lesjak, the CFO and interim CEO of HP. So ends this chapter of the Mark Hurd Chronicles. More →

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Nokia to sell wireless modem business to Japanese company Renesas

By on July 7, 2010 at 2:45 AM.

Nokia to sell wireless modem business to Japanese company Renesas

nokia-modem

The NYT reports that Nokia plans to sell its wireless modem business to Japanese company Renesas for $200 million. The NYT cites falling prices (the average cost of a modem is down to 30€ from 120€) and competition from Chinese companies Huawei and ZTE. In an official statement, Nokia wrote:

“The planned transfer of Nokia’s wireless modem business enables Renesas Electronics to maximize the value of Nokia’s technology assets and engineering expertise in delivering advanced mobile platform solutions to the market by combining them with Renesas Electronics’ market-proven multimedia processing and RF technologies.”

Most European wireless ISPs give away mobile wireless modems to their customers, making the margins in the wireless modem business extremely small. Nokia did emphasize that it would stay committed and focused on wireless LTE and HSPA+ technologies, which account for “17% of all broadband connection in Europe,” after the sale. More →

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New York Times: Palm Pre to launch first week of June

By on May 18, 2009 at 12:18 PM.

New York Times: Palm Pre to launch first week of June

A day before the expected Wall Street Journal announcement, a carefully crafted New York Times article about the upcoming summer season of blockbuster phones suggests the Palm Pre will launch date some time during the first week of June — “a few days prior” to Apple’s WWDC opening day on June 8th. Sounds like that June 5th to 7th window is spot on… Anyone planning on crashing that weekend-long launch meeting?

Thanks, Chiitown!

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