In an unexpected move, Google may launch its wireless service on Wednesday, The Wall Street Journal has learned, confirming some of the recent details that were leaked about Google’s game-changing carrier ambition.

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A recent report from Android Police revealed that Google wants to charge customers only for the data they use, and even get refunds for unused data, a practice that could further put pressure on regular mobile operators. That report also revealed the MVNO service would work only on the Nexus 6, according to information from an unreleased application for it, and that T-Mobile and Sprint will sell network access to Google.

The search giant would then be able to offer the customer the best possible experience, by actively switching from T-Mobile to Sprint and vice-versa, depending on signal strength.

The Journal’s report essentially confirms these details. Google will charge users exactly for the data they use, the service will be available only on the Nexus 6 initially, and T-Mobile and Sprint will provide the network access Google needs to deploy its virtual network.

The publication added that the service is expected to use Wi-Fi networks as well to route phone calls and data, in order to further reduce the bills of interested customers.

Actual pricing details for the service have not been revealed at this time. Google has already confirmed its MVNO plans, but it’s yet to announce a launch for the service. Previously, reports suggested that Google Wireless – a potential name for the service – will be unveiled at this year’s Google I/O conference, taking place in late May.

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