Following the many rumors detailing the 5.9-inch Motorola Nexus 6 (also known as the Nexus X or its codename, “Shamu”) smartphone, Android Police managed to confirm the existence of the handset, and many of its characteristics, providing more details about the device in the process, including a mockup image supposedly based on the phone’s design (available below).

FROM EARLIER: Leaked pic may show us just how massive the Nexus 6 will really be

According to the publication, the Shamu will be called Nexus 6 – not Nexus X as the more recent rumors suggested – and will run Android 5.0 L out of the box. Android Police is apparently able to confirm that with Android L, Google is moving to Android 5.0, something that was also previously rumored.

The Nexus 6 is based on the Moto X, although some design variations are expected, such as black front-facing stereo speakers and lower placements for the power and volume buttons.

When it comes to specs, Android Police says the phone packs a 5.9-inch QHD display with 496 pixel per inch (ppi), a 13-megapixel camera with optical image stabilization (OIS) and a dual-flash ring, a 2-megapixel front-facing camera and a 3,200 mAh battery with fast-charging technology.

As for Android L’ user interface, it appears the Nexus 6 will feature several changes, such as “revamped” icons for the dialer, Play Store and Gmail, “tweaked” icons for Maps and Google, a Drive apps folder, and a special “messaging” app.

Android Police says it hasn’t seen any proof to confirm the existence of a smaller version of the new Nexus phablet yet, in spite of what recent rumors have said. It’s not clear whether Google is working on such a device, or whether it’ll keep the Nexus 5 in stock for one more year.

Android Police’s Nexus 6 mockup follows below.

Chris Smith started writing about gadgets as a hobby, and before he knew it he was sharing his views on tech stuff with readers around the world. Whenever he's not writing about gadgets he miserably fails to stay away from them, although he desperately tries. But that's not necessarily a bad thing.