You’ll never guess what type of people use Google+ the most

Google Plus Social Activity Study

A new study looks into Google+ usage, a social network that has been labeled as a “ghost town” in the past for not being actually used as much as Google would want it to be. Performed by GlobalWebIndex (via Quartz), the new study shows that Google+ is mostly interesting to and therefore most used by… people who work in IT. Shocking, we know. Other top user types include senior “decision makers,” company owners, people who are self-employed and people living with friends or who are single. Since nearly a third of Google+ usage is tied to IT workers, Google’s social network is to engineers what Facebook is to moms and Twitter is to journalists, Quartz concludes.

Who isn’t using Google+ as much? Full time parents, support level employees, financial services employees and people with ages between 55 years and 64 years are the least likely to use the Google service, according to the same study.

Top Google+ users | Image credit: GlobalWebIndex via Quartz

Top Google+ users | Image credit: GlobalWebIndex via Quartz

The two-year-old Google+ social network has more than 540 million registered users, according to data released this October, however Google+ engagement and sharing may still be unimpressive. A Marketing Land study from July said that Google’s social network only accounted for 2% of social shares, just under LinkedIn and well below competitors including Facebook, Twitter and Pintrest.

Similarly, AdWeek on Monday reported that Google+ social engagement is still low for the July to September period. A Gigya study found that only 3% of all social sharing went to Google+ during the period, with the same Facebook, Twitter, Pintrest and Linked surpassing it in social activity.

Bottom Google+ users | Image credit: GlobalWebIndex via Quartz

Bottom Google+ users | Image credit: GlobalWebIndex via Quartz

BGR has its own Google+ page set up, which you can check out no matter what group above you belong to.

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