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The Note 7 isn’t the only phone causing Samsung problems

Updated 3 years ago
Published Jan 24th, 2017 8:00PM EST

Samsung has put to rest the Galaxy Note 7 scandal, but that might not be the only Galaxy-related problem the company has to deal with. Reports indicate that the Galaxy S7 edge might be suffering from a strange display issue that’s affecting plenty of users. Samsung has been pretty quiet about the issue, but it looks like Samsung’s Benelux division confirmed free repairs might be available free of charge if your phone is under warranty.

As you can see in the image above, various Galaxy S7 edge users complained about a vertical pink line that seems to appear in the same place, running along the entire height of the screen. This image Myce posted shows a number of Galaxy S7 edge models affected by it:

samsung-galaxy-s7-edge-pink-lineImage source: Myce

Apparently, this is a hardware problem that requires a screen replacement, rather than a software one that would be fixed with an update.

As Myce notes, users have complained about the issue on social media, including Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit, but also on YouTube and on Samsung’s support forums where there’s a 29-page thread on the matter.

Following up on Myce’s report, Dutch site Tweakers contacted Samsung Benelux to enquire about the matter. Samsung told the site that it’s aware of the issue and will issue free repairs under warranty as long as the screen isn’t damaged.

Apparently, the pink line appears on the screen after an impact. So if you drop your phone, you might run into the issue. The pink line might not appear immediately after the phone was dropped on a hard surface.

If you’re out of warranty, or you don’t want to send the handset to Samsung, there are a couple of unofficial fixes you can try, but they’re not permanent.

What you have to do is enter *#0*# using the dial pad, and then click on red, green, and blue to reset the individual pixels of each color. The second fix involves pressing gently on the top of the front-facing camera. The line will disappear, but only for a while.

Your best bet is having the problem serviced by Samsung.

Chris Smith Senior Writer

Chris Smith has been covering consumer electronics ever since the iPhone revolutionized the industry in 2008. When he’s not writing about the most recent tech news for BGR, he closely follows the events in Marvel’s Cinematic Universe and other blockbuster franchises. Outside of work, you’ll catch him streaming almost every new movie and TV show release as soon as it's available.