• A cracker distributor accidentally packed a bunch of product boxes with peanut butter cookies.
  • The cookies themselves aren’t harmful unless you have a peanut allergy, and that was enough to trigger the recall.
  • It’s unclear exactly how many packages were messed up, but the company claims it was a small number.

As though we need anything else to worry about in the face of the coronavirus pandemic, FDA recalls have been piling up left and right. So far this year we’ve had to avoid onions, peaches, and even diabetes medication because of potential health dangers. Now we’ve got another one, and while it’s a much smaller-scale recall than the others, it makes up for that by being totally bizarre.

In a company announcement posted by the FDA, B&G Foods has issued a recall of a small number of its Back to Nature Organic Rosemary & Olive Oil Stoneground Wheat Crackers. So, what is the problem this time? Salmonella? Listeria? Nope! The problem, apparently, is peanut butter cookies.

According to the company, a third-party packing facility mistakenly shoved a whole bunch of peanut butter cookies in the wrong boxes. If you bought a package of the organic crackers with a “Best By Date” of April 25, 2021, there’s a chance that the box doesn’t have wheat crackers at all, but is instead packed with peanut butter cookies.

B&G Foods discovered this issue when it received consumer complaints that the foil bags within two boxes of Back to Nature Organic Rosemary & Olive Oil Stoneground Wheat Crackers contained peanut butter cookies. The foil bags do correctly indicate whether the product contains rosemary & olive oil crackers or peanut butter cookies.

Now, as a big fan of both crackers and peanut butter cookies, I have to say that this sounds like an ideal situation for someone like myself. However, peanut allergies are a very serious concern, and those who are allergic to peanuts can have serious reactions to products containing peanuts.

While the company notes that the recall affects “only a very limited number of boxes,” the product is sold across the United States. The company says the crackers can be found in Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Nevada, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin.

There’s really no way of knowing which states may have received the incorrectly packaged goods, so act with caution if you have a box of these in your pantry and also happen to have a peanut allergy. The company says that the products pose no health risk to those without a peanut allergy, but for safety’s sake it’s probably best to just follow the recall guidelines and return the product to wherever you bought it for a full refund.

Mike Wehner has reported on technology and video games for the past decade, covering breaking news and trends in VR, wearables, smartphones, and future tech. Most recently, Mike served as Tech Editor at The Daily Dot, and has been featured in USA Today, Time.com, and countless other web and print outlets. His love of reporting is second only to his gaming addiction.