• Samsung launched a new Galaxy S20 promo that effectively reduces the price of all Galaxy S20 phones by 50%.
  • Samsung is offering buyers a 50% buy-back guarantee: you can return the handset in up to 24 months from purchase for 50% of the full retail value.
  • The phone has to be in good working condition, which means it can’t show any defects other than regular wear and tear.
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The Galaxy S20 is one of this year’s most impressive Android handsets, but it’s also a lot more expensive than we expected it to be. Staring at $999 for the cheapest version, the Galaxy S20 is $300 more expensive than the cheapest and most popular iPhone, the iPhone 11. When Samsung launched the phone in mid-February, I told you that you shouldn’t hurry to buy it. As with previous Galaxy S releases, the price should drop soon after launch, I said at the time. That happened just a few days ago when Samsung discounted the Galaxy S20 by $200. Sure, the discount didn’t apply to all S20 models, but it signaled that Samsung was ready to bargain. A week later, Samsung has an even better Galaxy S20 deal, one that covers all of its Galaxy S20 flavors. The Korean retailer is ready to provide a 50% buy-back guarantee on all S20 flavors, which practically means you’ll buy the handset for 50% of its regular price.

The coronavirus pandemic hurt Galaxy S20 sales significantly, although it’s hardly likely Samsung would have met its internal goal. Again, this phone was just too expensive compared to everything else out there. Samsung can set whatever starting price for its smartphones, just like any vendor in the industry. But Samsung phones just don’t age that well when it comes to value. It’s the one iPhone feature Android vendors failed to replicate.

Under the terms of the new deal, Samsung will get you 50% of your money back if you return the Galaxy S20 in satisfactory condition within 24 months of purchase. This is the new pricing structure for the Galaxy S20, S20+, and S20 Ultra under the terms of the new deal, assuming you take advantage of the deal:

Image Source: Samsung

You will have to pay the full price for the handset, however. If you take advantage of the offer, you might not be eligible for better discounts, although some deals will still apply:

Everyday trade-in offers can be combined with the guaranteed buy-back program but if you opt to receive 50% of your purchase price back when you return your phone in good condition, you will not be eligible for higher-value trade-in offers.

Also, carrier financing and Samsung Upgrade can’t be used to finance your purchase.

Finally, here’s what satisfactory conditions means, according to Samsung:

  • Your device must power on, hold a charge and not power off unexpectedly;
  • Your device must have a functioning display with no black spots or dead pixilation of any kind;
  • Your device must have no breaks or cracks, or other defects that go beyond normal wear and tear, including but not limited to: multiple scratches, dents, or dings; evidence of water damage, or; corroded charging port, SIM, or battery terminal contacts;
  • Your device must not be blacklisted or otherwise reported as stolen or compromised;
  • Reactivation Lock, Google Factory Reset Protection, or any other anti-theft locking software has been disabled – please perform a Factory Reset on your device before sending it to Samsung
  • All personal information has been removed.

In other words, you’ll have to take extra care of the phone. But that’s something you should consider regardless of how you buy the handset. You need a protective case for it, as the glass doesn’t handle drops with grace. And you might want to consider an insurance program just to make sure you qualify for that 50% buy-back guarantee.

What’s great about the deal is that it will also help you score cheaper Galaxy S and Note phones in the coming years, especially if you hang on to your phones for a longer period of time.

Chris Smith started writing about gadgets as a hobby, and before he knew it he was sharing his views on tech stuff with readers around the world. Whenever he's not writing about gadgets he miserably fails to stay away from them, although he desperately tries. But that's not necessarily a bad thing.