The relationship between the U.S. government and UFO researchers has always been a strange one. Releases of information on UFO observations by the government have always been scarce, leading to accusations of conspiracy and cover-ups. It doesn’t appear that’s going to change any time soon.

In 2018 a report surfaced describing the study of alleged otherworldly materials by at least one company under contract with the U.S., along with video of a days-long confrontation between unidentified aircraft capable of physics-defying maneuvers and U.S. Navy pilots. Now, The Washington Post reports that the Navy is taking new measures to secure information related to such sightings and, put simply, will continue to prevent the general public from learning about them.

One day prior to the Navy’s new info lock-down, Washington Post relayed word from a military official who claimed that UFOs have been observed near military bases on a regular basis for years, sometimes as often as several times every month.

Politico, which reached out to the Navy following the previous reporting, received the following official statement:

There have been a number of reports of unauthorized and/or unidentified aircraft entering various military-controlled ranges and designated air space in recent years. For safety and security concerns, the Navy and the [U.S. Air Force] takes these reports very seriously and investigates each and every report.

As part of this effort the Navy is updating and formalizing the process by which reports of any such suspected incursions can be made to the cognizant authorities. A new message to the fleet that will detail the steps for reporting is in draft.

The reports of unidentified aircraft include some seriously wild details, such as objects seemingly able to travel at incredible speeds and at angles that shouldn’t be possible by conventional aircraft.

Obviously the first thing that comes to everyone’s mind when they hear of UFOs is “aliens.” That may well be a plausible explanation for these sightings, but that doesn’t necessarily mean much to military officials who would be just as concerned over the spread of data if the objects turned out to be products of a foreign government or other entity.

Whatever they are, and wherever they come from, the U.S. government seems comfortable keeping its findings to itself.