Synology is a Taiwanese company started by two former Microsoft execs that’s known for its NAS devices, and the company has just introduced a new 1-bay NAS that’s compact, energy-efficient and which the company says is designed to be a perfect entry-level solution for users.

The product is the DiskStation DS119j, with Synology describing it as “tailor-made for the home environment” and only consumes 10.04 watts in full operation and just 5.01 watts in hard drive hibernation mode. That’s compared to a laptop which, of course, can consume upwards of 45 watts. Moreover, this NAS also features a “noise-dampening design” meant to be as quiet as a whisper, as the company describes it, compared to some PC counterparts.

The new NAS runs on DiskStation Manager, which is Synology’s operation system for NAS services and supports a variety of applications to enhance work productivity.

“There are many users who are not familiar with a NAS yet, nor are aware of the benefits of having one at home,” says Synology product manager Michael Wang. “DS119j is aimed to be an ideal choice for first-time NAS users with versatile software features, an intuitive user interface and an affordable price point.”

According to a product spec sheet, the NAS is backed by a 2-year limited warranty. It’s powered by a dual-core processor and is supported by a built-in hardware encryption engine. System installation is done with your existing web browser in just a few steps and is combined with a quick start widget to let users explore the operation system and complete basic system settings.

Synology also provides mobile applications for you to enjoy multimedia content on the go.

From a company description, “Synology DiskStation DS119j is a budget-friendly, versatile and easy-to-use 1-bay NAS with the capability to host, share and protect data for personal users. DS119j offers a variety of packages in its DSM Package Center, allowing beginners to explore the infinite possibilities of Synology NAS.”

Andy is a reporter in Memphis who also contributes to outlets like Fast Company and The Guardian. When he’s not writing about technology, he can be found hunched protectively over his burgeoning collection of vinyl, as well as nursing his Whovianism and bingeing on a variety of TV shows you probably don’t like.