Some 128GB iPhone 6 Plus owners with large app libraries have complained about unexpected crashes and reboots on their devices, with one report from South Korea suggesting the problem may lie with the memory modules chosen for this specific iPhone model, which could lead to a product recall. Soon after that, 9to5Mac refuted those claims, saying that Apple is aware of the “rare bug” and that the problem is not related to NAND flash memory.

In a new report, Digitimes agreed with 9to5Mac’s findings, saying that the memory controller is unlikely to be the cause of this particular iPhone 6 Plus problem.

FROM EARLIER: Why the chances of a humiliating iPhone 6 Plus recall are slim to none

According to the publication, “unspecified NAND flash chipmakers indicated that the adoption of [triple-level cell] TLC NAND memory by Apple must have gone through a ‘very rigorous’ testing procedure.” Business Korea speculated earlier this week that the cheaper TLC NAND memory may be to blame for these iPhone 6 Plus crashes.

“It is unlikely that Apple’s use of TLC NAND in 128GB iPhone 6 Plus is aimed at reducing costs, the makers believe. A phone with 128GB of storage requires a package using eight NAND chips. TLC NAND makes it easier than MLC NAND to make high-density modules, the makers said,” Digitimes added.

Digitimes says that TLC is slower and cheaper than single-level cell (SLC) or multi-level cell (MLC) memory, but notes that memory makes said that using TLC memory in the iPhone 6 Plus represents a “bold decision for Apple.”

Meanwhile, Apple has yet to explain what causes this particular iPhone 6 Plus bug.

Comments