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Urgent candy recall: This dangerous candy can poison you and your kids

Colorful candies, jelly and marmalade on stone background

A few days ago, we warned you about the El Chavito candy recall after the manufacturer discovered potential lead contamination. It turns out that’s not the only candy recall that involves a lead poisoning risk.

Other companies issued similar recalls for the same type of candy: dried salted plums. If you own any of the recalled candies from El Super Leon Ponchin Snacks, La Fiesta Food Products, or Rojas, you should stop eating them right now.

New candy recalls

El Chavitos issued the salted plums recall this month (read the FDA announcement here). The action involves two types of candies. One is Saladitos Dried Salted Plums, and the other is Saladitos Enchilados Salted Plums w/Chili.

The company sold the products nationwide through February 2nd.

El Chavito candy
El Chavito candy recall: Label for Saladitos Enchilados Dried Salted Plums w/ Chilli. Image source: El Chavito via FDA

El Super Leon Ponchin Snacks

On the same day as the El Chavitos recall, El Super Leon Ponchin Snacks issued a candy recall due to lead contamination. The recall follows lead testing from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published the recall announcement a few days later.

The recall covers El Leoncito and El Super Leon candies sold in California. They come in various weights including 1.05oz, 1.4oz, and 16oz. But we’re looking at similar flavors: Dry Salted Plum and Dry Salted Plum with Chili.

El Super Leon candy recall
El Super Leon recall: Retail package. Image source: El Super Leon Ponchin Snacks via FDA

La Fiesta Food Products

On February 4th, La Fiesta Food Products issued its own candy recall that impacts all its Saladitos Con Chile (Salted Plums with Chili) products. The candy can contain unsafe lead quantities that might be harmful to consumers.

To determine your stash is included in the candy recall, you should be looking for UPC 032327028290 on any La Fiesta Brand Saladitos Con Chile bags.

The company sold its salted plums in California, Nevada, North Caroline, and Georgia. The product was available in stores from December 1st, 2021, through January 31st, 2022. The full FDA announcement is available at this link.

La Fiesta candy recall
La Fiesta candy recall: Retail package. Image source: La Fiesta Food Products via FDA

Rojas

Finally, Rojas issued a recall on February 7th, citing potentially elevated lead levels in Lupag-branded Plain Dried Salted Plums. Check out the full announcement on the FDA website.

Rojas recall: Retail package. Image source: Rojas via FDA

The potentially contaminated dried salted plums come in 0.5oz bags with the UPC code 725535011337. The company sold the products in Southern California through the end of December 2021.

Another company recalls plum candies

Another one bites the dust, as they say.

In addition to the brands listed above and the El Chavito candy recall, American Gourmet has now issued a similar candy recall.

Announced via the FDA, American Gourmet Saladitos Dry Salted Plums have been recalled due to potential lead contamination.

Only one lot of the company’s candy is included in this recall: lot 211203. These packages of Saladitos Dry Salted Plums have a sell-by date of 12/03/2022 and the UPC code 1578600104. The bags contain 1.5 ounces of plums and and were sold for $0.99 each.

If you have any of these recalled candies at home, American Gourmet says you should not consume them. Instead, throw them in the garbage or return them for a refund.

If you need to contact American Gourmet, you’ll find those details in the recall announcement.

Lead poisoning symptoms

All these candies were recalled for the same reason, lead contamination. The companies urge buyers to stop eating the products immediately.

Customers who continue to eat these salted plums candies risk lead poisoning. Exposure to high amounts of lead can result in serious illness. Lead poisoning symptoms can include abdominal pain, vomiting, lethargy, irritability, weakness, behavior or mood changes, delirium, seizures, and coma.

On top of that, chronic exposure can affect developing fetuses, infants, and young children. Symptoms might not appear immediately, so parents won’t know their kids have consumed excessive levels of lead. As a result, children risk developing significant side effects that can take time to develop. Lead poisoning risks include learning disabilities, developmental delays, and lower IQ scores.

So far, the companies listed above say they’re not aware of reports of illness to date.

What you should do about the candy recalls

If you routinely consume any of the dried salted plums in these recalls, you should stop eating them right away. You can discard the products or return them to the place of purchase for a refund.

Furthermore, buyers concerned about exposure to lead should consider contacting their doctors or their children’s doctors.

Finally, make sure you check out the candy recall press releases mentioned above. You’ll find contact information for each of these companies and additional images.

Chris Smith started writing about gadgets as a hobby, and before he knew it he was sharing his views on tech stuff with readers around the world. Whenever he's not writing about gadgets he miserably fails to stay away from them, although he desperately tries. But that's not necessarily a bad thing.