Hopefully we can put the rampant speculation regarding the Apple Watch’s untimely demise to rest, at least for the time being. While Apple didn’t disclose specific sales figures during the company’s earnings report yesterday, Apple CEO Tim Cook did make a point of mentioning that Apple Watch sales thus far have “exceeded expectations.”

What’s more, Cook also added that demand for the Apple Watch still continues to outpace supply. But what should really nullify recent reports which claim that Apple Watch sales have ground to a fault is that sales of Apple’s new wearable are actually increasing, contrary to some recent third-party reports we’ve seen.

DON’T MISS: NYT hit-piece on the Apple Watch lacks some much needed context

“On the Watch,” Cook explained, “our June sales were higher than April or May. I realize that’s very different than some of the stuff being written, but the June sales were the highest. And so the Watch had a more of a back-ended kind of a skewing.”

And though one-off articles with titles like “Why I ditched my Apple Watch for good” tend to gain traction and attract eyeballs, the reality is that consumers who purchase the Apple Watch are genuinely enjoying it and use it quite often.

Not only is customer satisfaction with the Apple Watch higher than it is for the iPhone, but Tim Cook made a point of mentioning that Apple’s own market research “shows that 94% of Apple Watch owners wear and use it regularly, if not every day.”

Still not convinced?

Cook further added that early Apple Watch sales are actually outpacing early iPhone and iPad sales.

And to give you a little additional insight, through the end of the quarter, in fact, the Apple Watch sell-through was higher than the comparable launch periods of the original iPhone or the original iPad. And we were able to do that with having only 680 points of sale. And as you probably know, as I had reviewed earlier, the online sales were so great at the beginning we were not able to seed inventory to our stores until mid-June. And so those points of sale, pretty much, the overwhelming majority of the low numbers of sales were not there until the last two weeks of the quarter.

For some added context, take an illustrative look at what early iPod and iPhone sales looked like courtesy of The Daily Dot.

First up, we have the iPod which needed few quarters to really start chugging along.

ipod sales history

The iPhone started out stronger, but it also needed a few years before sales truly began to explode.

iphone sales history

All that being said, perhaps its high time that we give the Apple Watch some room to breath and mature before we casually dismiss it as a flop.

View Comments