Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
  1. AirPods Max Amazon
    11:49 Deals

    AirPods Max just hit a new all-time low at Amazon (cheaper than Prime Day!)

  2. Best PlayStation 5 Accessories
    15:17 Deals

    Have a video game console? This $48 device on Amazon makes it feel so much faster

  3. 07:17 Deals

    ESPN+ delivers Wimbledon coverage like you’ve never experienced before

  4. Best Amazon Finds Under $30
    08:33 Deals

    10 Amazon finds under $30 each that people are obsessed with right now

  5. MyQ Smart Garage Door Opener
    08:37 Deals

    Oops! Prime Day’s best-selling smart home gadget is still down to $17




More details emerge about the Pixel 2’s hidden camera chip

October 26th, 2017 at 5:59 PM
Pixel 2 Pixel Visual Core

The Pixel 2 phones have two processors, including the Snapdragon 835 found in many of this year’s flagship Android handsets, and a the Pixel Visual Core, custom Google creation that’s dedicated to the camera. It turns out that special image processing chip isn’t a Google-only creation. Intel helped.

The Pixel 2 is receiving plenty of bad press right now because of the XL’s bad display, but the Pixel 2 cameras have received praising reviews. And what’s interesting about the current camera experience of the Pixel 2 is that it doesn’t even use the Google chip.

Google said that the Pixel Visual Core is supposed to only handle camera jobs and that it will be enabled via a software update in the future.

Strangely enough, Google chose not to talk about the Pixel Visual Core chip during the phone’s press event, and instead only unveiled its existence ahead of the phone’s launch, fully knowing that teardowns will discover it.

Unsurprisingly, the Pixel 2 teardowns did find the chip and CNBC observed that the serial number on the chip begins with SR3 just like some Intel chips.

Google then confirmed in an email that it did work with Intel on the Pixel Visual Core, noting that none of the existing chips had exactly what Google wanted for the Pixel cameras.

The CNBC did not reveal any other details about Intel’s involvement, but Ars Technica dug deeper to find “Monetter Hill” as the probable codename for Intel’s chip.

This may be a big win for Intel, as the company has struggled for years to crack the mobile business. Last year, Intel started working with Apple on LTE chips for the iPhone.

Chris Smith started writing about gadgets as a hobby, and before he knew it he was sharing his views on tech stuff with readers around the world. Whenever he's not writing about gadgets he miserably fails to stay away from them, although he desperately tries. But that's not necessarily a bad thing.




Popular News