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Japan has a crazy plan to create artificial gravity on the Moon

Blue full moon against milky way galaxy

Interest in putting humans back on the Moon has been making a comeback in recent years. From plans to take us back to the lunar surface, to plans that involve a literal space station orbiting our lunar body, there are a lot of projects centered around the Moon. So, it shouldn’t be much of a surprise to learn that Japan wants to create artificial gravity on the Moon.

This is Japan’s crazy plan to bring artificial gravity to the Moon

The proposal was outlined in a press release in July. And, to be honest, it looks like something right out of a science fiction movie. The plan, as proposed, consists of three main elements. The first element is called “The Glass”, and it aims to simulate artificial gravity on the Moon and Mars using centrifugal force.

Gravity on both the Moon and Mars are small percentages of what gravity is on Earth. And, with new reports showcasing how long-term exposure to space can lead to bone damage in astronauts, it’s important to find ways to alleviate a lot of those concerns. Building massive cones that simulate gravity on the Moon could help with that.

The company behind the cones designed them to have a radius of around 328 feet, and a height of 1,312 feet. They’ll complete a single rotation every 20 seconds, creating 1g worth of gravity for people inside. The researchers are currently targeting the second half of the 21st century for the construction of the Lunar Glass, which would create artificial gravity on the Moon.

Is it possible?

moon base
Concept art for a future Moon base network. Image source: ICON/SEArch+

Ultimately, creating artificial gravity on any kind of scale is going to be difficult. Especially when you start looking at the technological capabilities that we have right now. First, you have to consider that it has been decades since mankind last walked on the Moon. On top of that, we have to deliver all the supplies to the lunar surface. That’s an undertaking on its own.

From there, we need to have a place for people to stay and work on the actual construction of the Lunar Glass. Creating artificial gravity is intriguing, though. And the plan has other moving parts involved. Of course, targeting the back half of the century means waiting 50 to 70 years. It’s possible that technology might advance a bit by then.

But would it advance enough to create artificial gravity on the Moon and let us live there? I suppose we’ll find out.

Joshua Hawkins fell in love with writing and technology at a young age. Eventually he decided to combine the two and started writing about video games, the latest tech, and all the cool gadgets he could find. Whenever he isn’t busy writing about tech or gadgets, he can usually be found enjoying a new world in a video game, or tinkering with something on his computer.