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Check your freezer for these delicious chicken meals that were just recalled

Chicken Pot Pie on a plate

Chicken pot pie fans out there should be on the lookout for a brand new recall that concerns Great American Cobbler products. The recalled frozen meals might contain an allergen that’s not declared on the label. If you or anyone in your household are allergic to soy, you should avoid consuming the chicken pot pie from the recall.

That’s because allergies to food ingredients can have life-threatening effects on some people. As a result, food manufacturers often recall products that test positive for undeclared allergens.

The Great American Cobbler chicken pot pie recall

The US Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) recently announced the recall of 4,272 pounds of chicken pot pie from Great American Cobbler.

The company produced the frozen Creole Style Chicken Pot Pies on August 19th, 2021, and November 3rd, 2021. But the ingredients label does not list soy, which is a known allergen. A routine FSIS inspection determined that soy is present in the meals but does not appear on the list of ingredients.

The agency says the chicken pot pies were sold in three states: Georgia, Wisconsin, and Virginia. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions following the consumption of these Great American Cobbler products. But they have a long shelf life, so people may still have these recalled meals in their freezers.

The chicken pot pie products subject to recall have the establishment number “P47401” inside the USDA mark of inspection. You also have to look for lot codes 21231 and 21307, and best by dates of 02/19/2023 and 05/03/2023 on the 2-lb cardboard box. Images of the chicken pot pie retail package in this recall are available below.

Great American Cobbler chicken pot pie recall
Great American Cobbler chicken pot pie recall: Front of the retail box. Image source: Great American Cobbler via FSIS

Soy allergy symptoms

People who suffer from soy allergies will experience symptoms similar to other food allergies. Per the Mayo Clinic, soy allergic reactions are rarely frightening or life-threatening.

The signs appear within minutes or hours after consuming a product that contains soy, like the chicken pot pies in the FSIS recall.

Symptoms can include tingling in the mouth, hives, itching, and scaly skin. Swelling of the lips, face, tongue, throat, and other body parts can also occur. Other soy allergy symptoms include wheezing, a runny nose, breathing difficulty, abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea or vomiting, and skin redness.

Like-threatening symptoms are similar for all food allergies. A person might have trouble breathing as the throat swells up. A severe drop in blood pressure can also occur, and the pulse can increase. People might also experience dizziness, lightheadedness, and even loss of consciousness.

Great American Cobbler chicken pot pie recall
Great American Cobbler chicken pot pie recall: Front and sides of retail box. Image source: Great American Cobbler via FSIS

What you should do

The recall announcement won’t impact all chicken pot pie buyers in the same way. You can still eat the product if you don’t suffer from a soy allergy.

But if any family members or friends have this condition, you should dispose of the product immediately to reduce the risk of adverse effects. You can also return the Great American Cobbler Handcrafted Premium Creole Style Chicken Pot Pie to the store for a refund.

People concerned about having developed soy allergy symptoms should consider contacting their doctor.

As always with recalls, make sure you read the full announcement for complete details, including contact information for the manufacturer. Check it out over at the FSIS.

Chris Smith started writing about gadgets as a hobby, and before he knew it he was sharing his views on tech stuff with readers around the world. Whenever he's not writing about gadgets he miserably fails to stay away from them, although he desperately tries. But that's not necessarily a bad thing.