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Users find Apple's iPhone and iPod shocking, literally

Zach Epstein
May 20th, 2009 at 1:33 PM

No, seriously. Apple just put up a new support page in response to claims from many users regarding electrical shocks received from Apple’s iPhone and iPod earbuds. The shocks are described as “small and quick”, but clearly the issue is serious enough to warrant an official response from Apple. The aforementioned support page, found below on the read link, describes the situation as follows:

When using headphones in areas where the air is very dry, it is easy to build up static electricity and possible for your ear to receive a small electrostatic discharge from the headphones. Receiving a static shock from a pair of earbuds does not necessarily indicate an issue with the iPod, iPhone, or earbuds.

This condition is very similar to dragging your feet across a carpet and receiving a static shock by touching a door knob. However, instead of the static charge building up on your body, the charge builds up on the device that the earbuds are connected to. Likewise, instead of the static buildup discharging through your finger when you touch a door knob, it discharges through the earbuds.

Apple goes on to claim this is an issue that affects equipment from other manufacturers as well and then recommends a few solutions, such as using anti-static hand lotion or wearing “clothes with natural fibers since synthetic fibers are more likely to hold a static charge.” Umm, Apple wants people to change their wardrobes because its headphones are shocking ear canals? Yeah, so we’re going to go ahead and stick to third-party headsets from here on out. Kthx.

Thanks, Tyrone!

[Via Cnet]

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Zach Epstein

Zach Epstein has worked in and around ICT for more than 15 years, first in marketing and business development with two private telcos, then as a writer and editor covering business news, consumer electronics and telecommunications. Zach’s work has been quoted by countless top news publications in the US and around the world. He was also recently named one of the world's top-10 “power mobile influencers” by Forbes, as well as one of Inc. Magazine's top-30 Internet of Things experts.




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