Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
  1. Amazon Gift Card Promotion
    14:41 Deals

    Amazon’s giving away $15 credits, but this is your last chance to get one

  2. Control Garage Door With iPhone
    08:10 Deals

    Unreal deal gets you Amazon’s hottest smart home gadget for $23 – plus a $40 c…

  3. Self-Emptying Robot Vacuum
    16:11 Deals

    Amazon coupon slashes our favorite self-emptying robot vacuum to its lowest price ever

  4. Amazon Deals
    07:58 Deals

    10 deals you don’t want to miss on Saturday: $5 Alexa smart plugs, $110 electric sta…

  5. Amazon Echo Auto Price
    11:41 Deals

    Last chance to add hands-free Alexa to your car for $19.99 with this Amazon deal




Target: Yes, hackers got encrypted PINs along with stolen cards

December 27th, 2013 at 2:15 PM
Target Encrypted PIN Data Safe

Target on Friday confirmed that hackers managed to steal encrypted data including encrypted PINs, as reported by Reuters earlier this week, but added that the PIN numbers are still safe and hackers shouldn’t be able to use the information to compromise debit cards. According to the retailer, the PIN information is encrypted at the keypad and it remains encrypted within the system until it is decrypted only by the external payment processing company. The PINs were encrypted with Triple DES, “a highly secure encryption standard used broadly throughout the U.S.” 

“Target does not have access to nor does it store the encryption key within our system. The PIN information is encrypted within Target’s systems and can only be decrypted when it is received by our external, independent payment processor,” the company wrote. “What this means is that the ‘key’ necessary to decrypt that data has never existed within Target’s system and could not have been taken during this incident.”

Even though Target is trying to reassure its customers that their information is still safe, some banks have already started to issue replacement cards while also lowering limits for existing cards. Meanwhile, stolen credit card data has already been seen trading on the black market, and some phishing attempts targeting potential Target victims have been reported.

Chris Smith started writing about gadgets as a hobby, and before he knew it he was sharing his views on tech stuff with readers around the world. Whenever he's not writing about gadgets he miserably fails to stay away from them, although he desperately tries. But that's not necessarily a bad thing.




Popular News