Right now the standard maximum frame rate for Android apps is 60 frames per second, although most apps don’t run at 60FPS on a consistent basis. However, Google is working on what could be a game-changing experiment that could double Android apps’ frame rates and make them run smoother than ever before, as Ars Technica reports.

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The central piece of this initiative is Dart, an in-house web development language that Google is now trying to bring over to Android. This would effectively free Android developers from having to code in Java and would give them a completely clean slate to work with. While we can’t imagine developers jumping with excitement at the thought of having to learn a new language, it looks like Dart will have some pretty cool advantages that will be hard to resist.

The biggest advantage is that it could allow developers to make apps that run at 120 frames per second, which is something that Ars notes “isn’t even possible to display on the standard 60Hz smartphone screens we have today.” Nonetheless, it seems that Google is thinking toward the future with this project and it’s already got some developers playing around with the programming language to see what it’s capable of when ported to Android.

Check out a video of Dart on Android in action below.

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