• Netflix, Disney+, HBO, and Hulu are all streaming services you need to pay for, or you need to at least get a password from a paying customer.
  • A rogue “FM radio” station that’s subscribed to several streaming services is streaming in real-time content from them simultaneously.
  • The app is available on PC and mobile, and you can watch in full-screen all the show, but there’s a huge, huge catch for free access: You’re not in control.
  • Visit BGR’s homepage for more stories.

If you’ve been struggling to keep with some of the original TV shows and movies available only on some streaming service you don’t have a password for, then you should know there’s a brilliant solution for that. A free and probably illegal streaming service is streaming shows around the clock not just from Netflix but from nearly every streaming service out there, including Disney+, Prime Video, HBO, and Hulu. However, there’s a mind-bending catch to it that nobody could have seen coming. It’s all random.

You may want to watch The Witcher in its entirety without buying a Netflix subscription, borrowing a password, or downloading the first season illegally. Or you may be interested in Game of Thrones — spoiler alert, avoid the final two seasons, with special emphasis on the last one — and you don’t have HBO. That’s a brand new site will come in handy, It’s called AllTheStreams.fm and it looks like this:

Image source: AllTheStreams.fm

Click on that See What’s Playing, and you’ll be treated to a random collection of shows from the streaming services listed in the lower half of the screen, including Hulu, Disney+, Netflix, HBO Now, Prime Video, and ShowTime.

Press the button on the left to move to the next channel, or just click on the desired streaming channel to switch to it. At the time of this writing, Avatar was streaming on Disney+, with a Witcher episode playing on Netflix.

Image source: AllTheStreams.fm

The problem is, you’re not in control of playback. You don’t get to select what’s playing, pause it for a bathroom break, or browse the catalogs of each streaming service. Interestingly enough, you can text a request to a phone number on the screen, but there’s no telling how long it might take for it to air. At least you get to stream whatever is playing in full screen if you were wondering. Also, the app works on mobile devices as well, just load the site in a browser and place your phone in landscape mode.

Image source: AllTheStreams.fm

Speaking of air time, AllTheStreams can’t stay up for much longer, so you might want to hurry to check out this weird contraption. The streaming giants listed above will probably do everything they can to take the site down. By the way, more than 230,000 people were streaming shows at the time of this writing, so there’s definitely a market for all of this.

Why are the people doing this… doing this? We have no idea, really. But here’s their manifesto, as posted on the site (image above):

Netflix has all the Netflix stuff, Disney has all the Disney stuff, and never the twain shall meet. Let’s change that, however briefly.

Whenever media becomes inaccessible, piracy thrives again – from the 1960’s BBC 1-hour limit on pop music to the iTunes store mp3 tyranny of the 00s. Today, All The Streams comes in response to the fragmentation and walled-garden paradigm that has risen to prominence for online video streaming services.

All The Streams doesn’t care about user-utility, it doesn’t care about scalability – and it certainly doesn’t care about terms of service! All The Streams is made to revel in platform independence, and to demonstrate how even the most lo-fi hacks can be the equal of giants.

At a time where “up next” tends to be hot algorithmic garbage, pirate radio offers up the idiosyncrasy of human decision across an unrestricted breadth of choice. We’re going to play anything and everything we feel like. We’re going to make a Frankensteinian playlist of media that none of these streaming platforms could ever recommend to you because it would cost them the profits of their exclusively-owned content. Sit back and enjoy the ride: like all pirate media offerings, we’re doing this for you.

Chris Smith started writing about gadgets as a hobby, and before he knew it he was sharing his views on tech stuff with readers around the world. Whenever he's not writing about gadgets he miserably fails to stay away from them, although he desperately tries. But that's not necessarily a bad thing.