The Galaxy Z Flip that Samsung just launched is the foldable phone the company should have delivered last year.

The Galaxy Fold turned out to be a huge disappointment, but its design failures certainly helped Samsung create an even better foldable, and should help other handset vendors looking to make their own foldable devices. If you’re looking for a foldable to buy, the Z Flip is really the only phone you should even consider right now — just ignore the Motorola Razr, Galaxy Fold, and the new Mate Xs. And it just so happens that Samsung has more Flip stock on hand today, so now’s the time to get your order in.

We have no idea how many Galaxy Z Flip units Samsung made for the foldable’s launch, but the available stock sold out quite fast. Reports that followed revealed Samsung has been dealing with manufacturing issues related to the coronavirus epidemic in Korea, but production has resumed, and Samsung is selling the phone online.

The Galaxy Z Flip costs $1,380 unlocked, but you can get it for just $940 if you trade-in a qualifying device — Samsung’s deal is available here. Not counting shady foldable phones made by drug lords, the Z Flip is the cheapest foldable you can buy, even if you have to pay full price for it.

Samsung’s clamshell might not have the personality of the Razr, but the Z Flip is more than $100 cheaper than Motorola’s first foldable, and sports better specs. The Z Flip is practically a Galaxy S10 or Note 10 when it comes to power, whereas the Razr is a mid-range device that’s priced at $1,500. Durability-wise, Flip still wins. Samsung’s phone has a better hinge, one that’s not only silent, but also lets you use the handset in a laptop mode, and a screen made of glass with a plastic cover on top. Motorola’s screen has two layers of plastic.

The following comparisons between the Razr and the Flip should help you with your next foldable purchase:


Chris Smith started writing about gadgets as a hobby, and before he knew it he was sharing his views on tech stuff with readers around the world. Whenever he's not writing about gadgets he miserably fails to stay away from them, although he desperately tries. But that's not necessarily a bad thing.