Oppo on Wednesday took the wraps off its latest creation, the Find 7 Android smartphone that was spotted in many leaks before the official announcement. One of the recent Find 7 reports said the phone can take 50-megapixel photos, an impressive feature for a smartphone, but it turns out the device doesn’t actually have a 50-megapixel sensor on board.

Instead, it’s all possible thanks to software tricks, as the sensor on the phone is actually a 13-megapixel Sony IMX214 CMOS. If that sounds familiar, that’s because it’s the exact same sensor that OnePlus announced for its One smartphone a few days ago. Pure Image 2.0 is the name of the software that makes 50-megapixel shots possible, Engadget reports. The camera takes 10 consecutive shots very quickly and then combines the best four into a 50-megapixel image. The main camera of the handset also supports 4K video recording.

Other Find 7 specs include a 5.5-inch IPS LCD display with QHD resolution (2560 x 1440) and 538 pixel per inch (ppi) ratio, 2.5GHz quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 801 processor, 3GB of RAM, 32GB of storage, microSD support up to 128GB, 5-megapixel front-facing camera, LTE, Wi-Fi ac, 3000mAh battery and Color OS 1.2 based on Android 4.3 Jelly Bean. This is the premium Find 7 version that will cost $599.

The more affordable model – dubbed as Find 7a or Find 7 Lite – will have a 2.3GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 processor, 1080p display, 16GB of storage and 2800mAh battery, and will cost $499.

Other interesting technologies found aboard the Find 7 phones include MaxxAudio and Dirac HD sound and VOOC rapid battery charging that will charge up to 75% of the battery in half an hour. Also interesting is the build quality of the phone – the Find 7 has five layers of thermal protective coating and a solid titanium-aluminum alloy frame crafted with nano-injection molding.

Limited Find 7 stock will be available starting with April, although the phones should hit various markets in May or June.

More Find 7 images and a video follow below.



Chris Smith started writing about gadgets as a hobby, and before he knew it he was sharing his views on tech stuff with readers around the world. Whenever he's not writing about gadgets he miserably fails to stay away from them, although he desperately tries. But that's not necessarily a bad thing.