The Samsung vs. Apple battle might be the biggest rivalry in the smartphone business, but Samsung and LG are also fierce competitors. Both companies are expected to come out with hot new Android phones in the near future, and while the Galaxy S8 should be unveiled a month after the LG G6, Samsung’s phone has reportedly delivered a huge blow to competitors already.

The LG G6 will be much more exciting than its predecessor, recent reports and leaks have shown. Gone is the modular design, and the device is getting a huge display that’ll be unlike anything we’ve seen so far in a smartphone. But the phone won’t receive one critical component, Forbes reports, and it’s Samsung’s Galaxy S8 that is to blame.

Apparently, Samsung has been hoarding Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 chips for the Galaxy S8. That means the LG G6 and all the other flagship devices that are launching before Samsung’s top 2017 phone will not get access to Qualcomm’s latest and greatest chipset.

The Snapdragon 835 should be the best mobile chip in town for Android devices. Built on 10nm technology, the chip will apparently make its debut with the Galaxy S8. Until April, the report says, no other device will get the 835. That’s why the HTC U Ultra has a Snapdragon 821 chip on board — and that’s the same chip that’ll power the LG G6, Forbes notes.

“The Snapdragon 835 won’t be available in large quantities until after the Galaxy S8 launches,” a source stated. The same person revealed that April 14th might be the Galaxy S8’s release date in South Korea.

The Snapdragon 821 is nothing to scoff at. It’s the chip that powers the Google Pixel, which is a hit with the Android-loving crowds in America. But there might be Android fans out there who value specs above everything else when buying a new phone. Those people could be inclined to choose the Galaxy S8 over the LG G6 this year.

It’s unclear how Samsung managed to hoard all of Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 835 supply. Of course, Samsung is mass-producing the chip for Qualcomm and that may have something to do with it. A report earlier this year claimed that yield issues with 10nm chips might have a negative impact on the mobile business. If true, the LG G6 might be the first big-name victim.

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