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Twitter is shutting down Revue, the company’s Substack competitor

Updated 1 month ago
Twitter hack
Image: AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Twitter is getting out of the newsletter game.

In an email to writers and readers, Twitter announced today that it will be shutting down its newsletter platform, Revue, in the coming month. Reports have predicted its demise for over a month now but, according to the company, the service will officially shut down on January 18, 2023.

We’ll cut to the chase: from January 18, 2023, it will no longer be possible to access your Revue account. On that date, Revue will shut down and all data will be deleted. This has been a hard decision because we know Revue has a passionate user base, made up of people like you.

The company says that you do have some time to take care of what you may need to get off the platform. It says that users will be able to “download your subscriber list, past newsletter issues, and analytics” before that date.

The company says that it will cancel any paid subscriptions to newsletters on December 20th, so if you run a paid newsletter on the platform, you’ll likely want to take care of a migration within the next few days.

If you run a paid newsletter, on December 20, 2022 we will set all paid subscriptions to cancel at the end of their billing cycle. This is to prevent your subscribers being charged for Revue content after the point where it is no longer possible to send newsletters from Revue.

Revue was acquired by Twitter in January 2021 as a way for the company to take on the newsletter business. It offers writers and publishers the ability to create and distribute newsletters with direct integration through the social media platform. However, the service never gained significant adoption and has failed to compete with other established newsletter platforms such as Substack and Mailchimp.

Joe Wituschek
Joe Wituschek Tech News Contributor

Joe Wituschek is a Tech News Contributor for BGR. With expertise in tech that spans over 10 years, Joe covers the technology industry's breaking news, opinion pieces and reviews.