Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
  1. Galaxy Star Projector Amazon
    09:43 Deals

    This awesome $32 gadget went viral on TikTok and now Amazon shoppers are obsessed

  2. Best Kitchen Gadgets
    08:33 Deals

    Amazon shoppers are obsessed with this $23 gadget that should be in every kitchen

  3. How To Save Money On Your Cable Bill
    15:37 Deals

    Your cable company is furious that we’re telling you about this $59 box on Amazon

  4. Amazon Gift Card
    07:58 Deals

    $25 in free Amazon credit beats any Prime Day deal – here’s how to get it

  5. Amazon Deals
    10:18 Deals

    Today’s top deals: Free $25 Amazon credit, $4 smart plugs, $15 Echo Auto with free m…




BlackBerry’s CEO still thinks Apple should let the government spy on users

July 20th, 2016 at 5:35 PM
BlackBerry CEO Apple iPhone Encryption

The Apple vs. FBI legal battle over the San Bernardino case in early 2016 was one of the most important events of the year so far, as user privacy, device security and terrorism converged in a single case. On one hand, we have Apple, keen on protecting everyone’s privacy. On the other hand, there’s the FBI, a law enforcement agency that demands access to any communication device that may have been used during the plotting of a heinous crime. Apple won that battle, and while many from the tech sector sided with the iPhone company in its fight against the FBI, there was one notable company that argued that encryption has to be broken when the government needs it: BlackBerry.

The irony did not escape us then, and it doesn’t escape us now — BlackBerry’s CEO still thinks Apple is wrong.

DON’T MISS: Leaked photos show a real iPhone 7 powered on for the first time

For years, BlackBerry’s data security was one its most important marketing tools, so you’d think BlackBerry would be a strong supporter of Apple. That’s not the case, however, as BlackBerry’s CEO thinks it’s not okay for Apple to protect criminals with encryption.

John Chen reiterated that point of view recently during the BlackBerry Security Summit, Patently Apple reports.

“One of our competitors, we call it ‘the other fruit company,’ has an attitude that it doesn’t matter how much it might hurt society, they’re not going to help […],” he said. “I found that disturbing as a citizen. I think BlackBerry, like any company, should have a basic civil responsibility. If the world is in danger, we should be able to help out.”

I find it disturbing as a consumer that the CEO of a tech company believes encryption should be accessible to law enforcement, no matter how noble the motive. Of note, however, Chen’s remarks should not be interpreted as signs that BlackBerry phones aren’t secure. But at this point, it’s not clear what data the company can and cannot share with the US government.

Chris Smith started writing about gadgets as a hobby, and before he knew it he was sharing his views on tech stuff with readers around the world. Whenever he's not writing about gadgets he miserably fails to stay away from them, although he desperately tries. But that's not necessarily a bad thing.




Popular News