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No clear evidence that mobile phone’s increase risk of cancer

Dan Graziano
April 26th, 2012 at 3:40 PM

According to the largest review of its kind, the British Health Protection Agency says there is no clear evidence that radiation from mobile phones poses a health threat, The Guardian reported on Thursday. Scientists found no convincing proof that radio waves from mobile phones cause brain tumors or any other type of cancer. They did caution that it was “important” to watch for signs of rising cancer cases, however, because they had too little information to assess the risk beyond 15 years of mobile usage. The study was conducted by the Health Protection Agency’s independent Advisory Group on Non-Ionising Radiation (AGNIR).

The AGNIR considered hundreds of peer reviewed scientific studies that looked at the effects of mobile phone radiation on cells, animals and people. “There are still limitations to the published research that preclude a definitive judgement, but the evidence overall has not demonstrated any adverse effects on human health from exposure to radiofrequency fields below internationally accepted guideline levels,” said Professor Anthony Swerdlow, chairman of the AGNIR and an epidemiologist at the Institute of Cancer Research.

Despite the information, Simon Mann of the HPA said the agency was not changing its long-held, precautionary stance that children should refrain from “excessive use” of mobile phones.

Professor Patricia McKinney at the center for epidemiology and biostatistics at Leeds University said, “The general public should be reassured by the conclusions on mobile phone use as the current evidence does not support any causal link to brain tumors or other cancers. However, the conclusions relate to mobile phone exposures of up to 15 years and further monitoring of possible risks is needed.”

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