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U.K. company makes hydrogen-powered iPhone battery that can purportedly last a full week

August 24th, 2015 at 9:25 AM
Hydrogen-Powered Smartphone Battery Intelligent Energy

Now this is intriguing. The Telegraph over the weekend reported that U.K.-based tech company Intelligent Energy has invented a new type of smartphone battery that runs on hydrogen and can purportedly last a week per charge.

MUST READ: Do this now: A step-by-step guide for encrypting your Android phone

Intelligent Energy has already created a modified version of the iPhone 6 that uses its patented hydrogen battery technology. The firm has added small vents to the back of the modified iPhone that let out water vapor waste produced by the battery. The battery itself is runs on hydrogen gas that is “refuelled via an adapted headphone socket,” The Telegraph writes.

Even more intriguingly, The Telegraph believes that the company is “working closely with Apple” on the project, so future iPhones could have long-lasting batteries that put current models to shame.

“We have now managed to make a fuel cell so thin we can fit it to the existing chassis without alterations and retaining the rechargeable battery,” Intelligent Energy CEO Henri Winand told The Telegraph. “This is a major step because if you are moving to a new technology you have to give people a path they are comfortable with.”

The company believes that the product is likely two years from being ready for the market but it’s definitely something we’ll be watching carefully to see if it really delivers on its promises.

Be sure to read The Telegraph’s full report on the experimental new battery by clicking here.




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