Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
  1. Amazon Kitchen Gadgets
    08:08 Deals

    This $20 Amazon kitchen gadget went viral on TikTok, and it’s mesmerizing

  2. Disney Plus Subscription Price
    13:22 Deals

    Disney Plus subscription price is free for 6 months from Amazon

  3. Best Camera Drone Deal
    08:45 Deals

    Amazon’s best camera drone deal is a 2K drone that folds up as small as an iPhone fo…

  4. Amazon Deals
    09:57 Deals

    Today’s top deals: Exclusive deals for Prime members only, $6 car detailing tool, $2…

  5. Amazon Best Sleep Aid
    10:44 Deals

    Amazon’s best sleep aid is a $16 product that works 20x better than anything else




Netflix just canceled this $200 million series after one season

June 3rd, 2021 at 5:30 PM
Netflix canceled Jupiter's Legacy

In early April, we talked about how the upcoming comic book series Jupiter’s Legacy could be the start of Netflix’s own superhero cinematic universe. The first season of the show debuted May 7th, and less than a month later, Netflix is pulling the plug.

Jupiter’s Legacy is based on a comic book series by Mark Millar, who is also responsible for Kick-Ass, Wanted, and Kingsman: The Secret Service. Netflix acquired the writer’s Millarworld imprint way back in 2017, with plans to turn its many publications into shows and movies for the streaming service, but its first big bet on a Millarworld property doesn’t appear to have paid off.

Today's Top Deal Apple AirPods 2 are down to Amazon's lowest price of 2021 List Price:$159.00 Price:$119.00 You Save:$40.00 (25%) Buy Now Available from Amazon, BGR may receive a commission Available from Amazon BGR may receive a commission

In a note on Twitter, Millar confirmed that Netflix would be focusing on other projects going forward, but seemed to hint that Jupiter’s Legacy could be revived in the future:

Supercrooks, which Millar mentions above, was a spinoff comic set in the same fictional universe as Jupiter’s Legacy. Unlike Jupiter’s Legacy, Netflix’s first adaptation of Supercrooks will be an anime produced by the studio Bones, best known for making My Hero Academia and Mob Psycho 100. There will also be a live-action series, but it’s still in the early stages of development.

Here’s the synopsis for the four-issue Supercrooks trade paperback that Netflix will be adapting:

One last heist. That’s what they all say, right? Just one final score, and everyone can retire and take up fishing. Thing is, the jails are filled with super villains who thought the same thing, and got busted. But the Heat’s in a jam. He’s run up the kind of gambling debt that – if he can’t pay it back in cash – will be paid in blood. Nobody wants to see the most beloved supercrook of all time rubbed out by the mob – especially his biggest fan, Johnny Bolt. And Johnny’s got a plan to help the Heat and make all his buddies disgustingly rich at the same time. Unfortunately for Johnny’s recruits, they have to head to Spain and rob the world’s most notorious super villain blind. And that’s where things get tricky.

Netflix certainly isn’t shy about canceling new shows nowadays, but having spent tens of millions of dollars on the rights to Millar’s empire, it’s surprising to see the company give up on a show that cost $200 million to produce this quickly. Fans will also note that the first season ended on a cliffhanger, so it’s clear that someone involved in the project expected to story to continue.

Netflix has had plenty of success in the genre with shows like Stranger Things, The Umbrella Academy, and The Witcher, but it has yet to find a major superhero franchise to challenge the likes of the Marvel Cinematic Universe or even The Boys on Amazon Prime Video. That said, it’s clear that Millar and Netflix plan to keep plugging away with other comic book adaptations to see what sticks.

Today's Top Deal 88,000+ Amazon shoppers love these luxurious bed sheets that keep you cool at night! Price:$34.95 Buy Now Available from Amazon, BGR may receive a commission Available from Amazon BGR may receive a commission

Jacob started covering video games and technology in college as a hobby, but it quickly became clear to him that this was what he wanted to do for a living. He currently resides in New York writing for BGR. His previously published work can be found on TechHive, VentureBeat and Game Rant.




Popular News