• The FDA warns that bleach won’t cure the coronavirus in a letter targeting websites that sell a form of the chemical under the name Miracle Mineral Solution (MMS).
  • Chlorine dioxide and other types of bleach do not kill the novel coronavirus, but can cause additional health problems if ingested.
  • There are no COVID-19 cures or vaccines at this point, and you can’t take anything to prevent an infection.
  • Visit BGR’s homepage for more stories.

In late January, when the novel coronavirus outbreak still looked manageable, we told you the coronavirus can’t be cured with bleach, or anything else for that matter. Some sites were selling bleach cures for the virus at the time. Nothing has changed since then. There is no miracle cure for COVID-19. The only way we’ll be immune to the disease is to either fight off an infection or get a vaccine. And some sites are still selling the same drugs.

If you hear of any Miracle Mineral Solution (MMS) cure that can treat the new infectious disease, you should stay away from it. MMS is a variation of bleach (chlorine dioxide) which can be very dangerous if ingested. And the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission have issued a stern warning to several sites promoting the supposed COVID-19 treatment

The FDA letter lists all the web addresses that are operated by the people who sell MMS as a cure for COVID-19, urging the owners of the sites in question to remove the misleading information.

“[You] sell products that are intended to cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent COVID-19 in people,” the letter reads. “We request that you take immediate action to cease the sale of such unapproved and unauthorized products for the cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of COVID-19.  Further, FDA has previously warned consumers about the dangerous and potentially life-threatening side effects of MMS.”

The regulator highlighted various examples of misleading claims on the websites in question, that promote MMS as a potential COVID-19 cure:

  • “14 people who were confirmed cases of COVID-19 (in Europe), took MMS and have recovered their health. All of these tested positive, and when re-tested after taking MMS, they
    came out negative for COVID-19.”
  • “Those of us who have used chlorine dioxide (MMS) over the years certainly expected it to also work with this virus, but we wanted to be sure, and now with this data, we are confident that the proper mixture of chlorine dioxide (MMS) has every hope of eradicating COVID-19.”
  • “If you have COVID-19: –Take Protocol 6 and 6 to start. This is one 6-drop dose of MMS, then one hour later take another 6-drop dose of MMS. — After two 6-drop doses of MMS, go on hourly doses of 3 activated drops in 4 ounces of water hourly . . . — For children, follow the same instructions as above and cut the amounts in half.”

These are just some of the examples provided, all of which are equally terrifying. Some of the pages in question also include instructions for how to take MMS and how to administer it to small children.

Again: Do not use any substance to treat a COVID-19 infection or to prevent the disease. Contact your doctor if you think you’ve got the disease and especially if you’re experiencing severe symptoms. Avoid scams like the one above, as well as others that promise a treatment or vaccine. Sadly, scammers and hackers have come forward with all sorts of campaigns to take advantage of gullible people during this health crisis.

Chris Smith started writing about gadgets as a hobby, and before he knew it he was sharing his views on tech stuff with readers around the world. Whenever he's not writing about gadgets he miserably fails to stay away from them, although he desperately tries. But that's not necessarily a bad thing.