Jason Bateman made it official with a tweet earlier today. Thanks to confirmation of another season of Ozark on the way, we’re going to get to see how much longer evil genius financial planner Marty Byrde can keep his drug cartel overlords happy along with holding everything else together in the backwoods of Missouri.

Re-upping the show, which co-stars Bateman and Laura Linney, for a third season will bring us 10 new episodes most likely sometime next year. Also returning: Chris Mundy as showrunner. 

Critics were somewhat mixed in their reviews of season two, which had more of a slow-burn quality than did the inaugural season. The Hollywood Reporter’s chief TV critic called the second go-round “gloomy, monotonous and poorly focused,” though the season currently boasts a score of 70 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, up a little bit from season one.

From THR: “The drama revolves around financial planner Marty Byrde (Bateman) and his wife, Wendy (Linney), and their family’s sudden relocation from the suburbs of Chicago to a summer resort community in the Missouri Ozarks as they navigate life within a dangerous drug cartel. Mundy serves as showrunner on the series; Bateman exec produces and directed multiple episodes. Bill Dubuque and Mark Williams created the series and exec produce the drama from Media Rights Capital and Bateman’s Netflix-based Aggregate Films.”

Another TV critic has argued that Ozark’s haul of Emmy noms — deserving as they are for a compelling, binge-able series — points to a hole in Netflix’s streaming armor: That the service is relying too heavily on volume, on a wide selection of titles like Ozark that get people buzzing and talking about them, but has little to show for it in the way of awards.

What Netflix really needs is a threat post-nominations, Ben Travers writes for IndieWire. Where, he wonders, is the next tentpole, the next House of Cards that racks and stacks a pile of awards? He points ruefully to these titles —

  • The Crown — Netflix’s uber-prestigious period drama snagged 13 nominations, good enough to tie for eighth highest among all shows. But that total is flat with what it earned in 2017 — when The Crown only won three trophies — and it trails Best Drama Series competitors Game of Thrones, Westworld, and The Handmaid’s Tale.
  • Stranger Things — Dropping from 19 nominations in 2017 to 12 in 2018, Stranger Things 2 looks to be less of a threat than its predecessor on Emmy night. And even the first season only won five trophies (none at the Primetime Emmys).
  • GLOW — Netflix bet heavy on the freshman series and scored 10 nominations. But Alison Brie didn’t get a Lead Actress nomination, and the writers were shut out, too. GLOW also trails its Best Comedy Series competitors Atlanta (16), The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel (14), and Barry (13).
  • Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt – Once a comedy star, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt had to split its season in half just to qualify, and that effort only amounted to two nominations. It’s in the Best Comedy Series race, but it’s trailing every other series.”

Then again, all of that probably discounts what’s arguably the biggest prize of all, which is the matter of signing up and keeping as many paying subscribers as possible. Ozark has a solid fanbase, and so it’s back to the backwoods we go.

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