Korean rivals Samsung and LG both unveiled new 8K TVs at the IFA 2018 expo in Germany, devices that should deliver even better picture quality than the best 4K TVs available in stores right now.

These certainly sound like the TVs we deserve right now, but like TVs that we don’t really need right now. But someone has to start the 8K revolution, and it might as well be two of the traditional players.

Several factors make buying an 8K TV seem overkill for the time being. For starters, it’s not like there’s an abundance of 8K content to take advantage of. Not to mention that streaming 8K content will need fast internet as well, the kind of broadband that’s not available everywhere.

Finally, there’s the price to consider. Neither Samsung nor LG mentioned prices for their new 8K TVs, but don’t expect them to be cheap. At least, not for the time being. Sharp is already selling 70-inch 8K TVs for over $13,000 so you can expect comparable prices from rivals.

Samsung

Samsung came out with the Q900R QLED 8K series (image above) that will be available in four sizes in September, including 65, 75, 82, and 85 inches. All of them will feature Real 8K Resolution, Q HDR 8K, Quantum Processor 8K, and 8K AI Upscaling.

Real 8K Resolution delivers 4,000 nit peak brightness and four times more pixels than a 4K UHD TV and 16 times more pixel than a Full HD TV. Q HDR 8K optimizes brightness and produces images as intended by creators.

With 8K AI Upscaling, the TV will use artificial intelligence to upgrade picture and sound quality to a level comparable to 8K, regardless of the original quality of format — and this might solve one of the problems I just mentioned, the lack of proper content. The Quantum Processor 8K can recognize and upscale the content in 8K, regardless of source. It can even be a mobile device, Samsung says.

Image Source: LG

LG

LG did not offer as many details about its OLED TVs but said it launched the world’s first 8K OLED TV. The model will come in a single size, 88 inches, and feature 7680 x 4320 resolution. That’s over 33 million self-emitting pixels that will deliver an “unmatched contrast ratio.”

LG did not specify prices or release dates either but did say that the 8K TV market may be at its infancy, but it should grow to more than five million units by 2022, with LG “committed to leading the ultra-premium market.” In other words, it’ll be as expensive as you expect.

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