Verizon’s unlimited data plan has barely been around for six months, but we’re already on the third (and most expensive) version. It started well: $80 for virtually unlimited data, with the only restrictions being a 10GB cap on mobile hotspot, and a “soft cap” of 22GB a month, after which users would be potentially slowed down.

But in August, Verizon split its offering in two: a $75-per-month plan that had video throttled to standard definition and lower-priority data, and an $85-a-month plan that throttled video to 720p. To be clear, that makes the $85-a-month Beyond Unlimited plan more expensive than Verizon’s original plan, and with worse-quality video.

As of November 3rd, however, there’s a new option. For an additional $10 a month, you can now remove all video throttling restrictions. For those keeping score at home, that means that Verizon’s basically restored the same level of service as its original $80-a-month plan, only it now costs $95 per month.

Verizon didn’t announce the move with a typical press release, and CNET picked the news up this morning. That’s probably for the best, as otherwise, Verizon would be left making difficult justifications for why it’s introduced the $10-a-month video add-on. Back in August when it started throttling video, it said that there’s no real difference in quality between 720p or anything higher — so why would it be offering higher-quality video two months later?

Verizon didn’t immediately return a request for comment from BGR.

This feels like the kind of feature-creep plan changing that telecoms companies have been employing recently. It’s become rampant in the home broadband industry: telecoms providers are introducing caps to a region, and then offering “truly unlimited plans” — the same thing customers have been on for years — for $50 a month more.

Chris Mills has loved tinkering with technology ever since he worked out how to defeat the parental controls on his parents' internet. He's blogged his way through Apple events and SpaceX launches ever since, and still keeps a bizarre fondness for the Palm Pre.