The Galaxy Note 7 debacle taught Samsung a thing or two about quality assurance practices, especially for things that can explode. It’s sad that Samsung had to deal with this particular problem after so many years of building smartphones, but at least Samsung learned its lesson. No Galaxy S8 has exploded since the phone’s launch, and it looks like there’s no reason to worry about any Samsung phone going forward.

But Samsung isn’t stopping at simply ensuring that existing batteries won’t explode. It’s also working on a type of battery that won’t be able to catch fire even if something bad happens to it.

Samsung SDI is working on solid-state batteries that might be used in smartphones as soon as next year, The Korea Herald reports.

“Our technological level to produce a solid-state battery for smartphones will be mature enough in one to two years,” a Samsung SDI executive told the paper. “However, it depends on Samsung Electronics whether it will be used for phones.”

The same person said that LG Chem is working on similar products.

Solid-state batteries contain no liquid that can spill and lead to explosions and fires. Current lithium-ion batteries, like the ones that powered the flawed Galaxy Note 7, have liquid electrolytes.

The batteries could be deployed in electric vehicles down the road, but no sooner than 2025, a Samsung SDI source said.

Toyota apparently has the most advanced solid-state battery tech for cars in the world, and it’s expected to hit the market even sooner, in 2020.

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