Many people have been quick to praise Samsung for owning up to a major Galaxy Note 7 flaw and issuing a global recall of the highly praised product. But Samsung isn’t following the proper recall protocol in the US, and consumer watchdog groups aren’t happy.

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Samsung is taking a financial hit that may amount to $1 billion, with many saying that what’s most important for the company is regaining the trust of the consumers, especially now with the iPhone 7 about to be released. Samsung said it will voluntary replace as many as 2.5 million Galaxy Note 7 units that were already shipped to retail partners and consumers. That means existing Galaxy Note 7 owners will not have to pay anything for the replacement.

However, Consumer Reports is raising awareness that Samsung isn’t going through the proper recall channels in the US. The consumer advocate group is calling for an official recall of the Galaxy Note 7. As it stands, the recall may have made the news around the world, but it’s not officially recognized by the US government. This allows stores to continue selling the Galaxy Note 7 even if it might be dangerous for customers.

An official recall, Consumer Reports explains, involves the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), and would make phone sales illegal in the US. As of Friday morning, the Galaxy Note 7 was still available for sale at some retailers, the site noted.

An official recall would also include clear instructions for consumers. Samsung said that it will voluntarily replace sold Galaxy Note 7 units for new ones in the coming weeks, and you can learn how to trade in your old phone in this post.

An unnamed government official said there’s no official recall. A different government source told Recode that he or she would like “a more traditional recall announcement put in place.”

“Samsung should immediately initiate an official recall with the Consumer Product Safety Commission given the serious nature of the safety problem it identified with the Galaxy Note7,” Consumer Reports director of electronics testing Maria Rerecich said. “We are particularly concerned that phones continue to be available for sale today.”

Consumer Reports also pointed out to Samsung a few weeks ago that its Galaxy Note 7 isn’t waterproof, as advertised. The Korean giant then said it fixed the problem without explaining what models might be affected, and without extending warranties past the standard one-year period.

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