As of the end of 2015, data from market research company Net Applications showed that Google’s Chrome browser is used on 32.33% of desktop and laptop computers globally. Following the company’s next major update, however, that figure could grow substantially.

According to a new post on Google+ from Ilya Grigorik, a web performance engineer at Google, the company is nearly ready to roll out a new version of its Chrome web browser that will include the biggest speed boost Chrome has ever received in a single update.

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The next version of Google’s Chrome web browser will include a new compression algorithm called “Brotli,” which will replace the current compression algorithm in Google’s popular browser. Grigorik says Britoli will allow Chrome to compress data by up to 26% more than Chrome can in its current build, which represents a huge jump.

More compression means faster page loads, which results in a significantly faster browsing experience for end users.

Grigorik included the following image in his Google+ post:

And now for the bad news: No exact date has been shared for when the new faster version of Chrome will be released to the public.

Zach Epstein has worked in and around ICT for more than 15 years, first in marketing and business development with two private telcos, then as a writer and editor covering business news, consumer electronics and telecommunications. Zach’s work has been quoted by countless top news publications in the US and around the world. He was also recently named one of the world's top-10 “power mobile influencers” by Forbes, as well as one of Inc. Magazine's top-30 Internet of Things experts.