There’s a good chance that Apple will never live down its late co-founder and CEO’s curt email response to a customer complaining of reception issues with the iPhone 4. “You’re holding it wrong,” Jobs wrote, suggesting that the phone was working fine and any reception issues were the user’s fault.

Then, Antennagate happened.

Apple would never issue an official response like that to a potential problem, but one explanation of the skin irritation that some users are experiencing with the new Apple Watch actually might fall along the same lines.

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Some early Apple Watch buyers have found that the rubber Sport band is causing troublesome skin irritation. In some cases, this is due to an allergy and is unavoidable unless the wearer buys a different band. In other cases, however, the issue might be the wearer’s fault and a simpler solution is available.

Seriously, you might be wearing it wrong — this is an issue that has affected all wrist-worn wearables with rubber bands.

In a support document on Apple’s website, the company listed a few possible reasons that the Apple Watch could cause skin irritation. Among them is the fit — if the band is too loose, the constant rubbing caused by movement as users go about their days can cause irritation.

“For best results, the back of Apple Watch needs skin contact for features like Wrist Detect, the Taptic Engine, and the heart rate sensor,” Apple wrote on its website. “Wearing your Apple Watch with the right fit — not too tight, not too loose, and with room for your skin to breathe — will keep you comfortable and let the sensors do their jobs. You may want to tighten your Apple Watch band for workouts, then loosen it when you’re done. In addition, the sensors will work only if you wear Apple Watch on the top of your wrist.”

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The full support page is linked below in our source section.

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