Apple is preparing for a huge in-store iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus launch day this week, and the company’s secret playbook for September 19 has been made available to 9to5Mac. Apple has already sold more than 4 million iPhone 6 units in the first 24 hours of preorders, and it’s likely it’ll sell even more devices during the phones’ actual in-store launch.

FROM EARLIER: Here’s a look at 200,000 iPhone 6s on a 747 on their way from China

Unsurprisingly, Apple has a complex plan in order to make sure it moves as many iPhone 6 units as possible in its retail stores on Friday. Apple will be both handling walk-in customers who haven’t preordered the handset, and buyers who have already preordered their iPhones and chosen the personal pickup option their iPhone 6 of choice.

According to the document, as early as September 17 Apple retail stores will start receiving iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. At that point, 4% of overall inventory across SKUs will be held out in order for Apple to be able to replace any faulty iPhone 6 units, or at least one of each phone version. Furthermore, devices that have been preordered for in-store pickup will be set aside so they’re not sold to walk-in buyers.

At 5 a.m. on launch day, Apple specialists are instructed to start interacting with customers waiting in line, and divide them into to queues, one for pick-ups and one for walk-ins. Apple will also apparently use a new digital queue system to distribute reservations passes (via SMS or email), which can be stored inside Passbook by those iPhone 6 buyers that already own iPhones. Users who don’t have mobile devices will be given regular physical cards. Refreshments, including coffee and water, will also be provided.

The actual iPhone 6 sales will begin at 8 a.m., at which point customers in both lines will be handled by an Apple specialist who will process the purchase and offer Personal Setups for the new iPhone.

A picture showing Apple’s iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus launch day playbook follows below.

Chris Smith started writing about gadgets as a hobby, and before he knew it he was sharing his views on tech stuff with readers around the world. Whenever he's not writing about gadgets he miserably fails to stay away from them, although he desperately tries. But that's not necessarily a bad thing.