Jury close to verdict in $1 billion Microsoft antitrust suit

By on December 16, 2011 at 12:30 PM.

Jury close to verdict in $1 billion Microsoft antitrust suit

A jury in Utah reportedly said it is close to reaching a verdict in a case that could cost Microsoft $1 billion in damages. Software firm Novell filed an antitrust lawsuit against Microsoft in 2004 claiming the firm had initially agreed to launch Novell’s WordPerfect program with Windows 95, but then went on to release its operating system without the word processing software. The move cost Novell $1.2 billion according to the company’s claims. Microsoft argued that Novell’s software was not stable enough and instead opted to use its own software, Microsoft Word. The Associated Press on Friday reported that the jury in the case is close to finishing deliberations, though it is unclear how soon a verdict might be announced. More →

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Apple exonerated in Cover Flow patent case

By on April 5, 2011 at 11:40 AM.

Apple exonerated in Cover Flow patent case

A federal judge ruled on Monday that Apple, Inc. did not infringe upon the patents of company Mirror Worlds in the creation of its Cover Flow interface. Mirror Worlds filed its initial lawsuit in 2008, claiming that Apple copied technologies protected by its “document stream operating system” filing from 2004. Back in 2010, a U.S. District Court ruled in the plaintiffs favor and awarded Mirror Worlds $625.5 million in damages. Apple appealed, and the ruling was overturned by a federal judge citing a “lack of foundational support” for the charges. “In this case, Mirror Worlds may have painted an appealing picture for the jury, but it failed to lay a solid foundation sufficient to support important elements it was required to establish under the law,” reads the ruling. “Accordingly, the Court rejects Mirror Worlds’ case as to infringement and damages, while affirming it as to validity and inequitable conduct.” More →

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Pirate Bay trial comes to a close; four defendants found guilty

By on April 17, 2009 at 9:33 AM.

Pirate Bay trial comes to a close; four defendants found guilty

Today is a bad day to be a pirate. Early this morning, a verdict was reached in the trial of four men associated with The Pirate Bay, charged with assisting in making copyrighted content available. That verdict: Guilty of violating copyright law. TorrentFreak has been covering the trial since the beginning and those of you following along will know that the convictions aren’t exactly a surprise. We don’t want to call these men martyrs but things looked bleak for the four men from the start. This marks a huge victory for the music and movie industries in their ongoing efforts to deter people from sharing copyrighted content, and may also serve as a warning of sorts to those who facilitate illegal sharing. The four men — Pirate Bay founders Peter Sunde, Frederik Neij and Gottfrid Svartholm Warg, and financier Carl Lundstrom — were each sentenced to one year in prison and ordered to pay fines equaling $905,000 USD per defendant. All four men will likely file for appeals. On a sadly ironic note, the four men apparently learned of the verdict well before it was announced by the Swedish court — according to Peter Sunde’s lawyer, the court leaked the verdict to a journalist who informed Sunde of the conviction an hour before it was made public.

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