Verizon to activate 28 new 4G LTE markets on Thursday, expand others

By on July 18, 2011 at 9:40 PM.

Verizon to activate 28 new 4G LTE markets on Thursday, expand others

Verizon Wireless just announced that it will activate its 4G LTE network in 28 new markets on Thursday. The new markets include Decatur and Huntsville, Alabama; Colorado Springs, Colorado; Lakeland and Sarasota-Bradenton, Florida; Augusta, Georgia; Hilo, Honolulu, Kahului-Wailuku and Lahaina, Hawaii; Carbondale, Illinois; Wichita, Kansas; Louisville, Kentucky; Baton Rouge and Hammond, Louisiana; Springfield, Massachusetts.; Greensboro/Winston-Salem/High Point and Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Toledo, Ohio; Tulsa, Oklahoma.; Portland, Oregon; Wilkes Barre/Scranton, Pennsylvania; Charleston, South Carolina; Chattanooga and Knoxville, Tennessee; Olympia and Tacoma, Washington; and Charleston, West Virginia. Verizon Wireless also said that it will expand the 4G LTE footprints already available in Phoenix, Arizona; Los Angeles and San Diego, California; Las Vegas, Nevada; Northern New Jersey; Dallas-Forth Worth and San Antonio, Texas; and Seattle, Washington. On Thursday, the carrier’s LTE network will be available in a total of 102 markets. Read on for the full press release. More →

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Throwback Thursday: The Motorola RAZR

By on May 19, 2011 at 3:59 PM.

Throwback Thursday: The Motorola RAZR

Motorola has produced several iconic handsets during its storied existence. The DynaTAC, the Vader, the v60 and of course, the Motorola RAZR. What Nokia did for the candy bar-style mobile phone in the 1990′s, Motorola did for the flip phone in the early 21st century. Thin, sleek and stylish, the RAZR was initially brought to market in early 2005. The handset was light, easily fit in the pocket and packed a flat, backlit keypad that proved itself to be a formidable text messaging obstacle. The device was so popular, in fact, that just over 1-year ago we were still talking about the handset — the RAZR3 — before it was scrapped by Moto in favor of Android-based smartphones. During its four year reign of terror, where it retailed for nearly $200 on-contract, over 110 million RAZRs were sold by dozens of carriers the world over. We still have an AT&T V3 lying around BGR HQ for posterity sake, and although its utility is diminished, the handset’s mystique remains. How about it: how many of you cell phone junkies were proud RAZR owners?

BGR’s Throwback Thursday is a weekly series covering our (and your) favorite gadgets, games, and software of yesterday and yesteryear.

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Throwback Thursday: Pocket Rockers

By on December 16, 2010 at 4:31 PM.

Throwback Thursday: Pocket Rockers

Back for another installment of Throwback Thursday? After several weeks of technology focused throwbacks, we’re going to revisit the retro toy scene as December 25th is right around the corner. If you’re a young music aficionado, there is a good chance you’ve already swindled your parents into buying you an iPod or digital music player of some sort. Heck, if you’re parents are really nice you might even have one of those new fangled “smartphones” that functions as a music player. However back in the 1980′s, such things didn’t exist. Sure, there was the Sony Walkman, but they were a hot item and not typically something bought for an adolescent. If only there was something that could fill the void in the market, if only there was… Pocket Rockers.

Marketed by Fisher Price in the late 80′s, the Pocket Rockers was a small, cassette-based music player with a built in speaker and headphone jack. The device played proprietary miniature cassettes that held two songs and, like all cool things in the 80′s, could be worn on your person. The commercials depicted young music lovers dancing around, with their feathered bangs and rolled-up jeans, wearing the Rocker-cassettes of their favorite artists. After all, who would want to keep the fact that they love Debbie Gibson a secret? Tiffany, Genesis, and Cutting Crew were a few other artists that had two-track cassettes available for the player.

If you’re still having a hard time remembering, follow the jump. There is an awesomely bad 80′s commercial waiting to jog your memory. More →

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Throwback Thursday: The Electric Carving Knife

By on November 25, 2010 at 3:33 PM.

Throwback Thursday: The Electric Carving Knife

Since it is Thanksgiving here in the United States, we thought it would be appropriate to cover a piece of kitchen technology in this week’s installation of Throwback Thursday. Today, in honor of the holiday, we’re covering a gadget invented over forty years ago that may be part of your T-Day celebration today, the electric carving knife.

Patented in 1964 by Jerome L. Murray, the high-tech piece of cutlery looks like a cross between a standard hand-mixer and a pair of electric hedge trimmers. The knife works its magic by rapidly moving two serrated blades back and forth over a central plane. The appliance gained popularity in the late 1960′s after is was manufactured by companies like Black & Decker, although it is less popular today thanks to one major drawback: maintenance. Electric knives have to be taken-apart and cleaned after every use to prevent the growth of bacteria between the blades and in the motor housing, making the convenience of such an appliance negligible.

Although not as popular as it once was, the knife is still used to cut the traditional Thanksgiving squab in houses all around the U.S.

Keep your ears open today, and if it sounds like someone is trimming a rhododendron bush in your kitchen… know that Mr. Murray’s electric knife is hard at work. Happy Thanksgiving!

BGR’s Throwback Thursday is a weekly series covering our (and your) favorite gadgets, games, and software of yesterday and yesteryear.

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Throwback Thursday: Apple IIgs

By on September 30, 2010 at 4:59 PM.

Throwback Thursday: Apple IIgs

Apple made a lot of beige boxes back in the 1980′s, but for some reason, if you ask someone about their first computer, the Apple IIgs often comes up. The IIgs was originally released on September 15, 1986, and was one of the first Apple computers to use a 16-bit microprocessor. Running at a blistering 2.8 MHz, the “g” and “s” stood for “graphics” and “sound” respectively. The IIgs packed an 8-bit Ensoniq wavetable sound chip that offered 32 separate channels of sound, and a video card that could dazzle the eye with a 12-bit pallet of 4,096 colors. The graphics card could also push graphics in native resolutions of 320 x 200 pixels or 640 x 200 pixels. The IIgs originally came with 256 KB of RAM built-in (later updated to 1.125 MB) and could be upped to 8.125 MB for those power users; the IIgs also included 128 KB of ROM (later updated to 256 KB). You would often see a matching beige floppy drive, keyboard, mouse, and dot-matrix printer hanging off the side of the GS; making this the ultimate Oregon Trail, word processing machine. Anyone out there ever own an Apple IIgs? How about the Woz: Special Edition?

BGR Throwback Thursday is a weekly series covering our (and your) favorite gadgets, games, and software of yesterday and yesteryear.

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Throwback Thursday: Mike Tyson's Punch-Out

By on September 23, 2010 at 4:47 PM.

Throwback Thursday: Mike Tyson's Punch-Out

If, like us, you owned a Nintendo Entertainment System, then there is a high likelihood you also owned Mike Tyson’s Punch-Out. When you loaded that sweet, 8-bit, Punch-Out cartridge into your NES system, you assumed the roll of Little Mac; a young and physically underwhelming boxer working his way up the professional ranks. Little Mac takes on a host of characters including: Glass Joe, Von Kaiser, Piston Honda, Don Flamenco, King Hippo, Great Tiger, Bald Bull, Soda Popinski, Mr. Sandman, and — the namesake — Mike Tyson. You had to dodge, block, jab, and (when permitted) uppercut your way to victory — all while keeping your eye on Little Mac’s ever dwindling heart meter. Victory was attained by knockout (KO), knocking your opponent down for 10 seconds or longer; technical knockout (TKO), knocking your opponent down three times in one round; or by decision, earning more points than your opponent at the end of three rounds. The game, which was first released in 1987, is thought by many to be one of the great, original NES classics. How about it? Did anyone ever successfully make it to the final round and conquer Iron Mike? More →

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Throwback Thursday: Lego Mindstorm Robotics Invention System

By on September 9, 2010 at 3:32 PM.

Throwback Thursday: Lego Mindstorm Robotics Invention System

We’re taking you back on this one… way back. Lego’s Robotics Invention System was released commercially in 1998 and was first utilized in educational settings thanks to a partnership with MIT’s Media Lab. So what did this “robotics” kit contain? Well, two motors, two touch sensors, and one light sensor. You used the included software to program the device, and it would perform completely on its own; acting according to the programmed instructions. Left, right, stop, start. If you had more than one unit, they could even “talk” to each other if they were within a certain distance. Not only could you program the brick (also known as the RCX) to perform what you wanted, but these were Legos — you could make them into whatever you wanted. Lego followed up the original Robotics Invention System with version 2.0 and, in 2006, with the NXT version. There is still pretty strong community support for these products even today. Did anyone else out there build two Lego robots and have them battling to the death?

BGR Throwback Thursday is a weekly series covering our (and your) favorite gadgets, games, and software of yesterday and yesteryear.

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